AAR
Click here for full forums index
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 
Time to read
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AAR Forum Index -> Romance Potpourri Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
EC Sheedy



Joined: 14 Oct 2007
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 10:13 pm    Post subject: Time to read Reply with quote

Lately, I've been having a heck of a time, finding long uninterrupted times to read. I've been doing all my reading in bits and pieces, ten minutes here, a half hour there, or when I go to bed at night, tired after a busy day. And I'm wondering if it's just me who finds this reading process both hard and irritating.

There's a difference, isn't there, in how much you get out of a book reading it by the shot glass, rather than by the wine glass? I actually get scared off a book with too-long paragraphs and dense prose, because I'm afraid my current reading style just won't do the book--or the author--justice.

I really am thinking of a reading holiday, so I can lose myself in my TBR pile.

Just a tiny rant to ease my frustration,
EC
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Schola



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1867

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:27 am    Post subject: Re: Time to read Reply with quote

EC Sheedy wrote:
There's a difference, isn't there, in how much you get out of a book reading it by the shot glass, rather than by the wine glass? I actually get scared off a book with too-long paragraphs and dense prose, because I'm afraid my current reading style just won't do the book--or the author--justice.


I love that analogy and find that I share your predicament.

How about "reading by the sprint" rather than "reading by the marathon"? I used to do marathons all the time as a student, but ever since I started working, I've had to read many of my novels in ten- to twenty-minute sprints. (The nature of my work, you see.)
_________________
"To be in a romance is to be in uncongenial surroundings. To be born into this earth is to be born into uncongenial surroundings, hence to be born into a romance." (G.K. Chesterton)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sssspro



Joined: 26 Mar 2007
Posts: 531

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have found my reading tastes have changed just for this reason. I used to LOVE the long meaty books. Give me a Gabaldon or Cranham any day. I STILL love them, but find I do not have the time of patience to read them.

With life, a career, 2 kids under 8, a house, a husband, and all that goes with all of that, I find I can read for 45 minutes at lunch, a few minutes for bathroom breaks during the day and at night before going to bed for about 45 minutes (I even read at red lights on my commute to and from work). I am not an anthology fan, but have found myself reading more of them and more e-books, which tend to be shorter too. I also read more erotica/romantica because they also are usually shorter. Its a horrible trade off to have to make, but like you, I find I miss too much when I attempt to read a long meaty book. All the stops and starts is just too distracting for an "intellectual" book.

There are even some authors like Elosia James, who I really like, but because she is quite erudite and puts all kinds of information or references in her book, I find myself missing the analogies when I read her books.

Trying to go on a reading binge, for me, is out of the question, I just don't have the time.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cheri



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 1350
Location: michigan

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find less time during the summer than during any other time of year. My kids are both gone (one at boot camp the other at a YMCA camp) for this week. I PROMISED myself I would take one day and just spend it reading. nothing else. Well it's Wednesday and I still haven't had time. Between a construction job going on at our house to my everyday errands, there just isn't time. I'm on the same groove you are. Little snatches of time here and there and a little after a long day. cheri
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do most of my reading at night, but I have never been one to sit endlessly and read anyway. I've accomplished that a few times, but it's not something I can do. I've always got something else going on, or thinking of what I have to do. *sigh* I often wonder, if I had a week of nothing to do, nobody around to interrupt, if I would take that time to really catch up on my reading. It's a nice thought and I picture myself happily going through the books that I have ready to read. *sigh again*.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tee



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 4225
Location: Detroit Metro

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

xina wrote:
I do most of my reading at night, but I have never been one to sit endlessly and read anyway. I've accomplished that a few times, but it's not something I can do.

That's where I'm at in my life, too, xina. Occasionally, when I was still working outside of the home, on a day off, I would couch potato it with a good book. However, those days are gone, since I can't sit still for too long a time anymore. Don't know why, but there it is. When E C Sheedy used the comparison of the shot glass and wine glass, that was me totally. A book takes much longer these days for me to read, but I can only take it in small doses. Actually, that's not so bad after all, I find, because I'm absorbing more of the details of the story than I usually did when I tried to take it all in at a breakneck speed.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Elizabeth Rolls



Joined: 26 Mar 2007
Posts: 1081
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
There's a difference, isn't there, in how much you get out of a book reading it by the shot glass, rather than by the wine glass? I actually get scared off a book with too-long paragraphs and dense prose, because I'm afraid my current reading style just won't do the book--or the author--justice.


When I taught full time I used to read a lot of poetry for just that reason. It was good for the tram ride to and from work. Light fiction was good too; romance or crime/mystery. I saved bigger reads for the holiday periods and the really big reads for the summer when it didn't matter if I spent all day reading.

I still turn to poetry when my reading time is limited in some way. For example when I go to conferences. I need my reading fix, but don't necessarily have time for a book.

Elizabeth
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
EC Sheedy



Joined: 14 Oct 2007
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Elizabeth Rolls"]
Quote:
I still turn to poetry when my reading time is limited in some way. For example when I go to conferences. I need my reading fix, but don't necessarily have time for a book.

Elizabeth


Can you recommend some poetry, Elizabeth? I used to read a lot of poetry, too, but have long since got out of the habit.

I have copied Mary Oliver's The Journey into my keeper journal and have always intended to seek out more of her work. Your comments have now set me to that task!
EC
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Anne Marble



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 606

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elizabeth Rolls wrote:
I still turn to poetry when my reading time is limited in some way. For example when I go to conferences. I need my reading fix, but don't necessarily have time for a book.

Elizabeth


That's a great idea. Very Happy I had stayed away from poetry for a while, although I used to write it in high school and college. (It turns out some of it was pretty good! Surprised ) But then I read a young adult book in the form of free verse and loved it. From what I've read since, it turns out that novels in verse are popular with some reluctant readers. You wouldn't think so because so many people are allergic to poetry. Wink But what matters most to many reluctant readers is the amount of text on the page, and a book in verse tends to have very short line length and short pages. I think we've forgotten that poetry used to be how people (even warriors) communicated important events such as battles. Maybe that's why humans can still respond well to it.

Since then, I ended up buying some poetry books. My favorite ones are those little shiny ones (no dust jacket) with poems by theme. They're durable, so you can put them on the night stand (or bath tub) for a quick read. Heck, many poems are so short you can read them while waiting for the microwave to nuke food or after applying hair conditioner that has to stay in your hair for a couple of minutes. The tiny ones also fit in your purse for reads in line, etc.
_________________
Join AARlist2 at http://www.likesbooks.com/listserv.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, that's not so bad after all, I find, because I'm absorbing more of the details of the story than I usually did when I tried to take it all in at a breakneck speed.[/quote]


I've always been sort of a book savorer anyway. I like to take my time and look forward to spending some quality time with a book. However, I'm always reluctant to start a 600+ page book, because I know I'll be spending much time with it and in that way, it better be worth my time. Laughing With a short book, it's over and done with it...move on, but a lenghy title, well, that takes at least a week...even 2. I have a really good friend in RL who is (what she calls) a speed reader. She can whip through a book in 2 hours and she's at my door returning it. I realize, that's the way she does things, but I like immerse myself in a story. She likes to whip through it. Different strokes...and all that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kristie(J)



Joined: 23 Mar 2007
Posts: 1129
Location: Southwestern Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I really am thinking of a reading holiday, so I can lose myself in my TBR pile.


I'm having one of those the last week of August. A girl from work and I are renting a cottage for a week right on a lake - no internet, no computer, no tv - just reading. Nothing but wonderful, wonderful reading! Although are reading tastes are totally opposite *s*. She reads horror and I read romance.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LinnieGayl



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 824

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kristie(J) wrote:
Quote:
I really am thinking of a reading holiday, so I can lose myself in my TBR pile.


I'm having one of those the last week of August. A girl from work and I are renting a cottage for a week right on a lake - no internet, no computer, no tv - just reading. Nothing but wonderful, wonderful reading! Although are reading tastes are totally opposite *s*. She reads horror and I read romance.


Kristie, that sounds like a nearly perfect vacation!
_________________
LinnieGayl
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mark



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 1392

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use small time slots for rereading, since I am willing to reread in bits & pieces. With first reads, I try to have enough hours available to finish the same day I start, which lately has had the effect of increasing the percentage of longer books in my tbr.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Elizabeth Rolls



Joined: 26 Mar 2007
Posts: 1081
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Can you recommend some poetry, Elizabeth? I used to read a lot of poetry, too, but have long since got out of the habit.


I would suspect, Mark, that you have read anything I have! And I think taste in poetry is even more individual than prose. However . . . I love Hardy, Donne, Keats, Shelley, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Thomas Traherne, George Herbert, de la Mare, T.S Eliot, Yeats, Auden, Emily Bronte & Emily Dickinson, some Tennyson, Masefield (writes a ripping yarn and I love his rhythms), - my tastes are fairly catholic and that is by no means a complete list. It depends on mood and to degree beliefs. I would not recommend either Donne or Herbert to an atheist, for example Shocked. On the other hand as a reader of romance you might well enjoy Donne's more secular verse - although you've probably read it. My father on the other hand described Donne as being rather "graphic" for his tastes when he caught me with a copy . . . Wink I haven't read much very contemporary poetry. At the time I really started reading poetry in my late teens, early twenties, I was busy catching up on all the old stuff Embarassed
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Elizabeth Rolls



Joined: 26 Mar 2007
Posts: 1081
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
But then I read a young adult book in the form of free verse and loved it. From what I've read since, it turns out that novels in verse are popular with some reluctant readers. You wouldn't think so because so many people are allergic to poetry. Wink But what matters most to many reluctant readers is the amount of text on the page, and a book in verse tends to have very short line length and short pages. I think we've forgotten that poetry used to be how people (even warriors) communicated important events such as battles. Maybe that's why humans can still respond well to it.


I am reminded of a student of mine, a real little tough, who loved a particular verse story in the school library. I was hearing him read aloud and complimented him on how well he'd caught the rhythm of the verse. Blank look from student. "Huh?" "The verse, Leigh. You're reading the poetry really well." 'It's not POETRY, Miss! I HATE poetry!" 'Miss' wisely shut up! I can't remember what the book was now. Something very Australian about a female cattle drover, so I found an illustrated copy of Banjo Patterson's Man from Snowy River and gave it to him without mentioning the "P" word.

Quote:
My favorite ones are those little shiny ones (no dust jacket) with poems by theme.


Anthologies of any sort are great. They introduced me to a lot of different poets. I'd find a poem I really liked and go looking for more by the same poet. I also found a lot of poetry because I trained as a singer and if the words caught me I'd go looking for the poet.

Elizabeth
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AAR Forum Index -> Romance Potpourri Forum All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group