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Suspense | Mystery Books Discussion II...
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Manda



Joined: 23 Apr 2007
Posts: 589

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I finally read Tana French's IN THE WOODS over the weekend and most of THE LIKENESS had mixed feelings about both. Spoilers Ahoy!

Technically I thought it was quite well done, though I was annoyed about the lack of resolution for the disappearance of Rob's childhood friends. But what really annoyed me was the dissolution of Rob and Cassie's friendship. I picked up THE LIKENESS hoping that there would be some reconciliation but after I did something I almost never do (skipped to the end) I realized that not only is there no reconciliation but Cassie gets engaged to Sam. I dunno. I know some people weren't overly fond of Rob, and I can see why. But I would have felt much better about the whole thing if French had at least let us see him dating someone and slightly settled. As it was I just finished both of them feeling disjointed and unsatisfied.

Even so I'm going to be thinking about these books for a while to come. Not sure I'm ready to read the next two yet, though.
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Maggie AAR



Joined: 23 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Still Life
Louise Penny

I had mixed feelings about this book. I was fascinated by the mystery but I really didn't fall in love with Gamache. The assistant whom he had to send home was almost frightening in her clueless-ness. I wondered if she would become a rival/villain at some point.

Still, I was interested enough that I got book two from the library.

maggie b.
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dick



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been reading Anne Perry's "Monk" novels, set in the Victorian era. I'm both intrigued and irritated by them. The mysteries strike me as problems to be solved rather than mysteries, although the last I read, "The Twisted Root," had a surprising, although horrifyingly Oedipal, conclusion. The romance in them is muted and requires a considerable amount of imagination to see as romance. The relationships though, especially that between the barrister and his father are insightfully delineated, as is the triangular relationship between him, the heroine (?), and the hero (?). I include the question marks because it's difficult to decide which of the two major male characters should be thus considered, and which of the possible heroines is the central one.
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Anne Louise



Joined: 30 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

maggie b. wrote:
Still Life
Louise Penny

I had mixed feelings about this book. I was fascinated by the mystery but I really didn't fall in love with Gamache. The assistant whom he had to send home was almost frightening in her clueless-ness. I wondered if she would become a rival/villain at some point.

Still, I was interested enough that I got book two from the library.

maggie b.


Maggie,

This is one of my favourite series. For me, the series improved with each book. I found Still Life a little slow but with each subsequent book, Penny's writing gets better, the story is tighter and Gamache is more understandable/admirable.
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LinnieGayl



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anne Louise wrote:

This is one of my favourite series. For me, the series improved with each book. I found Still Life a little slow but with each subsequent book, Penny's writing gets better, the story is tighter and Gamache is more understandable/admirable.


I'd have to agree with Anne Louise. I liked Still Life, but wasn't overwhelmed. However, I know a number of people who love the series so I kept going. It gets better and better with each book. At this point I'm so hooked on the series that I can't wait for the next book to come out. And I've gradually come to adore Gamache.

After the first I started listening to the series in audio. I can heartily recommend the narration by Ralph Cosham.
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Anne Louise



Joined: 30 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manda wrote:
I finally read Tana French's IN THE WOODS over the weekend and most of THE LIKENESS had mixed feelings about both. Spoilers Ahoy!


Even so I'm going to be thinking about these books for a while to come. Not sure I'm ready to read the next two yet, though.


Manda, just picked this up from the library. Haven't read your spoilers but after the hours I wasted on Gone Girl this weekend, I just might break down and read them before I start it.
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Anne Louise



Joined: 30 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 8:41 pm    Post subject: Still Life Reply with quote

LinnieGayl wrote:


I'd have to agree with Anne Louise. I liked Still Life, but wasn't overwhelmed. However, I know a number of people who love the series so I kept going. It gets better and better with each book. At this point I'm so hooked on the series that I can't wait for the next book to come out. And I've gradually come to adore Gamache.

After the first I started listening to the series in audio. I can heartily recommend the narration by Ralph Cosham.


LinnieGayl,

Sounds like a treat. Just checked our library and I believe they have all of them in audio. Can't wait to "relisten"
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LinnieGayl



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Still Life Reply with quote

Anne Louise wrote:

Sounds like a treat. Just checked our library and I believe they have all of them in audio. Can't wait to "relisten"


I hope you like them in audio. It's now my preferred media for the series.
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dick



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently read Marion Chesney's "Hasty Death," subtitled "An Edwardian Murder Mystery." It is part, I understand, of a series starring Captain Harry Cathcart as a peer who has opened a detective agency and is often "assisted" by Lady Rose Summer, daughter of the Earl of Hadshire. It was great fun. One example which made me laugh out loud: Lady Rose is lamenting having to accompany her mother to balls, soirees, etc., and lists all the rules she has to remember, including taking care not to sit on a seat which is still warm from a male's bottom.
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veasleyd1



Joined: 02 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a hobby genealogist, so I snapped up the five inexpensive e-books by G. G. Vandagriff (Poisoned Pedigree, etc.). The mystery series is set in 1993-1994, before major internet resources, when researchers still had to do genealogy "the hard way." I enjoyed the first one; I also enjoyed the title above, which is set in Barry Co., MO. As I worked through them, though, I became increasingly annoyed with the whiny insecurities of the heroine and the increasingly intrusive religious messages. Even for a genealogist, the series as a whole gets a C-.
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Maggie AAR



Joined: 23 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dick wrote:
I recently read Marion Chesney's "Hasty Death," subtitled "An Edwardian Murder Mystery." It is part, I understand, of a series starring Captain Harry Cathcart as a peer who has opened a detective agency and is often "assisted" by Lady Rose Summer, daughter of the Earl of Hadshire. It was great fun. One example which made me laugh out loud: Lady Rose is lamenting having to accompany her mother to balls, soirees, etc., and lists all the rules she has to remember, including taking care not to sit on a seat which is still warm from a male's bottom.


I think Marion Chesney is terrific. Loved her "Poor Relations" Regemcy romances. I'll have ot check out her murder mysteries.

maggie b.
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MrsFairfax



Joined: 27 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

veasleyd1 wrote:
I'm a hobby genealogist, so I snapped up the five inexpensive e-books by G. G. Vandagriff (Poisoned Pedigree, etc.). The mystery series is set in 1993-1994, before major internet resources, when researchers still had to do genealogy "the hard way." I enjoyed the first one; I also enjoyed the title above, which is set in Barry Co., MO. As I worked through them, though, I became increasingly annoyed with the whiny insecurities of the heroine and the increasingly intrusive religious messages. Even for a genealogist, the series as a whole gets a C-.


Virginia, you might like The Blood Detective by Dan Waddell. Nigel Barnes is a family historian who ends up helping the police solve crimes that have a historical motive. The first clue's a bit of a stretch, but I like Waddell's writing style and his characters very much.
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MrsFairfax



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LinnieGayl wrote:


After the first I started listening to the series in audio. I can heartily recommend the narration by Ralph Cosham.


I love Ralph Cosham's narration of this series, but I had to give up on Beautiful Mystery. The depiction of monastic life is so amazingly wrong and the Latin translations so bad I was spending more time yelling at my iPod than listening. I may pick it back up if the next murder is back in Three Pines (still hoping for Peter to be the victim!).
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Manda



Joined: 23 Apr 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dick wrote:
I recently read Marion Chesney's "Hasty Death," subtitled "An Edwardian Murder Mystery." It is part, I understand, of a series starring Captain Harry Cathcart as a peer who has opened a detective agency and is often "assisted" by Lady Rose Summer, daughter of the Earl of Hadshire. It was great fun. One example which made me laugh out loud: Lady Rose is lamenting having to accompany her mother to balls, soirees, etc., and lists all the rules she has to remember, including taking care not to sit on a seat which is still warm from a male's bottom.


I read the first several of these back when the series first started. I need to revisit them, I think. Chesney was one of the first Regency romance authors I ever read and I found the Harry Cathcart/Lady Rose series to be just as fun.

Mrs. Fairfax, I have to admit that THE BEAUTIFUL MYSTERY is not my favorite of the Gamache series so far. But you should at least listen to the bits between Gamache and Jean Guy so you can be up to date for the next one. There were some developments there.

I've just finished the second of Jane Casey's Maeve Kerrigan mysteries. They follow the protagonist, a young DC on the London murder squad. I quite like Maeve and there is a quite good romance thread running through these. The first book, THE BURNING, suffered from some slow bits where I think Casey was trying a bit too hard to be procedural (sometimes that just reads as boring interviews that lead nowhere and don't advance the plot). But the second one, THE RECKONING, was much faster and I thought better balanced overall.
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Minerva



Joined: 05 Jul 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just finished The Walnut Tree by Charles Todd. I'm not quite sure how to describe this book. It is not a mystery. It is not a romance. It has plenty of descriptions of WWI and battlefield medicine. Bess Crawford is a very minor character. I enjoyed this novelette (longer than a novella, but shorter than a novel??). I'm rewatching Downton Abbey, so it suits my mood. I don't know how I would feel if I wasn't on a DA kick.
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