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veasleyd1



Joined: 02 Dec 2007
Posts: 2064

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've even managed to turn up some information on the fate of Susan Fox-Strangways, daughter of the earl of Ilchester, who was so imprudent as to marry an Irish Catholic actor. It's in a book about the history of the stage in England in the 18th and early 19th centuries that's op and has the full text online now. When the couple was sent off to America, it was with a 40,000 acre land grant and an government job for the husband -- contingent upon their staying away. They came back to England later.

http://www.archive.org/stream/hourswithplayers02cookuoft/hourswithplayers02cookuoft_djvu.txt
Full text of "Hours with the players"

Ilchester wasn't in a really strong position to be so disapproving of his daughter, given that the Fox family was only two generations removed from comparatively undistinguished origins itself.
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veasleyd1



Joined: 02 Dec 2007
Posts: 2064

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Melodrama with your morning coffee:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bowes,_Countess_of_Strathmore_and_Kinghorne

Additional details, with pictures:

http://www.sunnisidelocalhistorysociety.co.uk/eleanor.html

For more about her second husband, see:

Scandal: The Sexual Politics of the British Constitution (Hardcover)
by Anna Clark (Author)# Hardcover: 328 pages
# Publisher: Princeton University Press (December 2, 2003)
# Language: English
# ISBN-10: 069111501X
# ISBN-13: 978-0691115016
pp. 64-69


Forthcoming:

Wedlock
The True Story of the Disastrous Marriage and Remarkable Divorce of Mary Eleanor Bowes, Countess of Strathmore
Written by Wendy MooreWendy Moore Author Alert
Category: Biography & Autobiography - Historical
Format: Hardcover, 400 pages
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 978-0-307-38336-5 (0-307-38336-9)
Pub Date: March 10, 2009

We haven't even gotten to the adventures of her son John, the 10th earl of Strathmore, who lived out of wedlock with the countess of Tyrconnel, took a mistress after her death, had a son in 1811, married the woman in 1820 a day before his death, willing his property to the boy. There was quite a lawsuit over whether the marriage in England legitimated the son under Scottish law Rolling Eyes
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veasleyd1



Joined: 02 Dec 2007
Posts: 2064

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Proceeding onwards, we now introduce to you a man whose matrimonial efforts fall into the category of, "If it weren't for bad luck, I'd have no luck at all." He divorced his first wife, Frances Manners, for adultery; remarried; the second wife, Sarah Hussey Delaval, committed adultery so publicly with Frederick Duke of York that there's a Gillray caricature, and then left him to live with the 10th earl of Strathmore, dying at her lover's home and making "all the newspapers in the north" according to one local history.

George Carpenter 2nd earl of Tyrconnel


Generation No. 1

1. George Carpenter 2nd earl of1 Tyrconnel (George Carpenter 1st earlA Tyrconnell, GeorgeB Carpenter, 2nd baron Carpenter) was born 30 Jun 1750, and died 15 Apr 1805. He married (1) Frances Manners 09 Sep 1772, daughter of John Granby and Frances Seymour. She was born 24 Mar 1753, and died 15 Oct 1792. He met (2) Sarah Hussey Delaval 03 Jun 1780, daughter of John Delaval and Susannah Robinson. She was born 1763, and died 07 Oct 1800 in Gibside, County Durham, England.

Notes for George Carpenter 2nd earl of Tyrconnel:
Chronological Tables - Private Acts
Sep 5, 2005 ... George Carpenter Earl of Tyrconnel's divorce (Ireland) from Lady ... Act but in the sessional volume of Public Acts for 1777 (17 Geo. ...
www.opsi.gov.uk/chron-tables/private/p-chron18 - 148k - Cached - Similar pages


http://www.thepeerage.com/p1348.htm
George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell
M, #13479, b. 30 June 1750, d. 15 April 1805

Last Edited=21 Jun 2003
George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell was born on 30 June 1750. He married, firstly, Frances Manners, daughter of John Manners, Marquess of Granby and Lady Frances Seymour, on 9 September 1772. He and Frances Manners were divorced in 1777. He married, secondly, Sarah Hussey on 3 June 1780. He died on 15 April 1805 at age 54.
George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell gained the title of 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell.
Child of George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell and Frances Manners

* Susanna Carpenter+ d. 7 Jun 1827



Notes for Frances Manners:
http://www.thepeerage.com/p1349.htm#i13481

Frances Manners was born on 24 March 1753. She was the daughter of John Manners, Marquess of Granby and Lady Frances Seymour. She married George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell on 9 September 1772. She and George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell were divorced in 1777.
Her married name became Carpenter.
Child of Frances Manners and George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell

* Susanna Carpenter+ d. 7 Jun 1827


temp21
((1)), George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnel (b 30.06.1750, d 15.04.1805). m1. (09.07.1772, div 1777) Frances Manners (b 24/5.03.1753, d 15.10.1792, ...
www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/zworking/temp21.htm - 26k - Cached - Similar pages



More About George Tyrconnel and Frances Manners:
Divorce: 1777, (act of Parliament)
Marriage: 09 Sep 1772

Notes for Sarah Hussey Delaval:
http://www.christies.com/LotFinder/lot_details.aspx?intObjectID=1318590

JOHN DOWNMAN, A.R.A. (1750-1824)
A very fine miniature of Sarah Hussey Delaval, Countess of Tyrconnel, facing left in pale grey riding habit, white waistcoat and scarf tied at corsage, black riding hat with black feather and rosette in her powdered curling hair en queue; ship and seascape background
oval, 3¼ in. (83 mm.) high, silver-gilt frame
Lot Notes

Sarah (1763-1800), sixth and youngest daughter and co-heir of John Hussey Delaval, later Baron Delaval of Seaton Delaval and his first wife, Susannah (d. 1783), married George, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnel on 3 June 1780 and had an only daughter who was heiress to the Earl, Lady Susannah Carpenter, who married Henry, 2nd Marquess of Waterford. The Countess of Tryconnel left her husband to live with the Earl of Strathmore but died of a cold on 7 October 1800 at Gibside, co. Durham. She was buried in Westminster Abbey on 4 November 1800, aged 37.

Downman painted oil portraits of various members of the Delaval family, notably Lady Delaval (G. C. Williamson, John Downman, London, 1907, p. 13) and Miss Delaval (op. cit., p. 52). There is a miniature of Lady Delaval dated 1792 in the Victoria and Albert Museum (Salting Bequest P. 87-1910) which is a replica of an oil painting in the National Gallery. Two other miniatures of the Countess of Tyrconnel by Downman were sold in these rooms, 24 November 1981, lot 32 and 27 November 1989, lot 160. A portrait of the sitter's father was sold in these rooms, 30 April 1996, lot 143.


Sarah (Hussey), Countess of Tyrconnel (1763-1800), Wife of George Carpenter, 5th Earl of Tyrconnel
http://www.npg.org.uk/live/search/person.asp?LinkID=mp62164
Sitter associated with 2 portraits

Page 1 of 1
NPG D12999
'The accomodating spouse; Tyr-nn-es delight! - coming York over her; - or what you like'
by James Gillray, published by James Aitken
hand-coloured etching, published 15 May 1789
Archive Collection NPG D12999
NPG D13065
'The installation-supper, as given at the Pantheon, by the Knights of the Bath on the 26th of May, 1788
by James Gillray, published by Samuel William Fores
hand-coloured etching, published 4 June 1788
Archive Collection


http://www.seaham.i12.com/myers/m-bowes1.html
Augustus Hare (q.v.) later described Gibside as a beautiful place, with 'exquisite woods feathering down to the Derwent.' There were two ghosts, he says, one being Lady Tyrconnel of the spirited Delaval family, who lived with John Bowes, Mary's son, the tenth Earl of Strathmore, on rather too intimate terms. A lover of the theatre, John Bowes had become attached to her during amateur theatricals at Seaton Delaval Hall. Lady Tyrconnel's funeral in 1800 almost bankrupted the estate; he had her lie in state, with painted face and decked in jewels and Brussels lace from head to toe, in every town on the way to London, before final burial in Westminster Abbey.


Lord Fife and His Factor: Being the Correspondence of James Second ... - Google Books Result
by Alistair Tayler, Henrietta Tayler - 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 312 pages
Lord Tyrconnel married, secondly, in 1780, Sarah Hussey, then a minor, sixth and youngest daughter of John Hussey, Baron Delaval. ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=0898755719...


Equivocations of Gender and Rank: Eighteenth-Century Sporting Women
lived at Kew with Sir Francis Blake Delaval, was pronounced to have ..... instance (figure 21), who, at her divorce trial for adultery, defended her cor- ...
muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth-century_life/v026/26.1rizzo.pdf - Similar pages
by B Rizzo - 2002 - Cited by 1 - Related articles - All 5 versions

Eighteenth-Century Life
Volume 26, Number 1, Winter 2002
E-ISSN: 1086-3192 Print ISSN: 0098-2601
Rizzo, Betty.
Equivocations of Gender and Rank: Eighteenth-Century Sporting Women
Eighteenth-Century Life - Volume 26, Number 1, Winter 2002, pp. 70-93

More About Sarah Hussey Delaval:
Name 2: Delaval

More About George Tyrconnel and Sarah Delaval:
Single: 03 Jun 1780

Children of George Tyrconnel and Sarah Delaval are:
2 i. Susanna Hussey2 Carpenter, born 1782; died 07 Jun 1827. She married Henry Beresford 2nd marquess of Waterford 1805; born 1772; died 1826.

Notes for Susanna Hussey Carpenter:
Georgetown: The Earl of Shrewsbury Papers
Her mother was Susanna Hussey, only daughter and heir of George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnel. The 18th Earl of Shrewsbury died at Newbattle Abbey, ...
library.georgetown.edu/dept/speccoll/shrews.htm - 37k - Cached - Similar pages

More About Susanna Hussey Carpenter:
Name 2: Susannah Carpenter

Notes for Henry Beresford 2nd marquess of Waterford:
http://www.thepeerage.com/p1277.htm#i12762

Henry de la Poer Beresford, 2nd Marquess of Waterford was born on 23 May 1772. He was the son of George de la Poer Beresford, 1st Marquess of Waterford and Elizabeth Monck. He married Susanna Carpenter, daughter of George Carpenter, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnell and Frances Manners, on 29 August 1805. He died on 16 July 1826 at age 54.
Henry de la Poer Beresford, 2nd Marquess of Waterford gained the title of 2nd Marquess of Waterford.
Children of Henry de la Poer Beresford, 2nd Marquess of Waterford and Susanna Carpenter

* Lady Sarah Elizabeth Beresford+ b. 10 Nov 1807, d. 13 Oct 18841
* Henry de la Poer Beresford, 3rd Marquess of Waterford b. 26 Apr 1811, d. 29 Mar 18592
* John de la Poer Beresford, 4th Marquess of Waterford+ b. 27 Apr 1814, d. 6 Nov 18663

Citations

1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 350. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 607. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XIII, page 210.

More About Henry marquess of Waterford and Susanna Carpenter:
Marriage: 1805

3 ii. Child Carpenter, born 1784.


= = = = = =

Just wait for the adventures of Sarah's lover and the even more exciting life of her Uncle Francis.

Honestly, no plot an author could invent can match the stuff these people actually did. Plots have to be plausible Very Happy


Last edited by veasleyd1 on Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:06 am; edited 1 time in total
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veasleyd1



Joined: 02 Dec 2007
Posts: 2064

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now, here is Sarah Hussey Delaval, countess of Tyrconnel's, lover (who just happens to be the son of the melodramatic and "Unhappy Countess" of Strathmore whose tribulations are listed above. His marriage, which took place a day before he died, generated all sorts of interesting legal cases.


John Lyon-Bowes 10th earl of Strathmore

Generation No. 1

1. John Lyon-Bowes 10th earl of1 Strathmore (John Bowes 9th earl ofA, Thomas Lyon 8th earl ofB, John Lyon 4th earl ofC) was born 14 Apr 1769, and died 03 Jul 1820. He met (1) Sarah Hussey Delaval Bef. 1800, daughter of John Delaval and Susannah Robinson. She was born 1763, and died 07 Oct 1800 in Gibside, County Durham, England. He married (2) Mary Milner 02 Jul 1820. She died 05 May 1860.

Notes for John Lyon-Bowes 10th earl of Strathmore:
http://www.thepeerage.com/p229.htm#i2283

John Lyon-Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore was born on 14 April 1769. He was the son of John Bowes, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Mary Eleanor Bowes. He married Mary Milner on 2 July 1820. He died on 3 July 1820 at age 51.
John Lyon-Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore gained the title of 10th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne.
Child of John Lyon-Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore and Mary Milner

* John Lyon-Bowes


http://www.sunnisidelocalhistorysociety.co.uk/bowes.html
1790-1820 In 1790. Mary Eleanor's eldest son John, now 10th Earl of Strathmore, purchased his mother's life interest in Gibside. Like his grandfather, George Bowes, he loved Gibside and employed John Dobson to remove the third storey of the Hall in 1805 and adorn the South Front with a high battle mounted parapet pierced with huge crosses. He reconstructed the original Jacobean Porch and restored the inscriptions and arms facsimiles. He also added a plain wing for an office block. The Chapel was completed in 1812 and dedicated. George Bowes' body was then removed from Whickham and placed in the crypt.

The Tenth Earl also replanted woods which had been destroyed by Stoney. The Tenth Earl's private life was complicated, he fell in love with the rather wild Lady Tyrconnel, a member of the 'Gay Delaval' family of Delaval Hall. She died of consumption while staying at Gibside, causing a scandal which was widely reported in the Northern newspapers of that time. It was during this upset in his life that he completed the building of the Chapel and partly rebuilt the Hall. While staying at a Hunting Lodge near the family home at Streatlam, a servant girl, named Mary Milner attracted his attention. She was the daughter of a local gardener, totally uneducated by Society's standards. He set her up in a house in London and lived with her there for some years. In 1811 she bore him a son whom they named him John Milner Bowes. John, the Tenth Earl was very fond of his son, settling a large sum of money on him, and arranging for his education. In 1820, the Earl. who was a sick man at that time, decided to marry Mary Milner, a very noble and brave thing to do considering their perceived difference in class. Because of his illness, special arrangements had to be made, the Earl having to be supported during the ceremony. On the day after the wedding the Earl died. Claims were made, on behalf of the boy for him to inherit the title and the estates. The Tenth Earl, however had a younger brother Thomas, who also claimed the title and estates. After lengthy legal proceedings it was finally decided that the boy should have all the English property on his coming of age in 1832 and that Thomas become the Eleventh Earl and inherit all the Scottish property.

1820-1832 Mary Milner, now Dowager Countess of Strathmore, lived at Gibside and eventually married again in 1831. Her second husband was Mr William (later Sir William) Hutt, who had been her son's (John Bowes') tutor. She was 44 and William Hutt 24. Hutt was M.P. for Hull from 1832- 1841 and M.P. for Gateshead from 1841-1874. He was knighted in 1865 and later became an important figure in politics. Mr Gladstone and Lord John Russell were guests at Gibside. In 1860 the Dowager Countess of Strathmore, (the former Mary Milner), died and her body was placed in the crypt under Gibside Chapel beside that of her first husband, the Tenth Earl of Strathmore. Sir William Hutt continued to live at Gibside until 1875. He later married again and went to live in the Isle of Wight.

Notes for Sarah Hussey Delaval:
http://www.christies.com/LotFinder/lot_details.aspx?intObjectID=1318590


JOHN DOWNMAN, A.R.A. (1750-1824)
A very fine miniature of Sarah Hussey Delaval, Countess of Tyrconnel, facing left in pale grey riding habit, white waistcoat and scarf tied at corsage, black riding hat with black feather and rosette in her powdered curling hair en queue; ship and seascape background
oval, 3¼ in. (83 mm.) high, silver-gilt frame
Lot Notes

Sarah (1763-1800), sixth and youngest daughter and co-heir of John Hussey Delaval, later Baron Delaval of Seaton Delaval and his first wife, Susannah (d. 1783), married George, 2nd Earl of Tyrconnel on 3 June 1780 and had an only daughter who was heiress to the Earl, Lady Susannah Carpenter, who married Henry, 2nd Marquess of Waterford. The Countess of Tryconnel left her husband to live with the Earl of Strathmore but died of a cold on 7 October 1800 at Gibside, co. Durham. She was buried in Westminster Abbey on 4 November 1800, aged 37.

Downman painted oil portraits of various members of the Delaval family, notably Lady Delaval (G. C. Williamson, John Downman, London, 1907, p. 13) and Miss Delaval (op. cit., p. 52). There is a miniature of Lady Delaval dated 1792 in the Victoria and Albert Museum (Salting Bequest P. 87-1910) which is a replica of an oil painting in the National Gallery. Two other miniatures of the Countess of Tyrconnel by Downman were sold in these rooms, 24 November 1981, lot 32 and 27 November 1989, lot 160. A portrait of the sitter's father was sold in these rooms, 30 April 1996, lot 143.


Sarah (Hussey), Countess of Tyrconnel (1763-1800), Wife of George Carpenter, 5th Earl of Tyrconnel
http://www.npg.org.uk/live/search/person.asp?LinkID=mp62164
Sitter associated with 2 portraits

Page 1 of 1
NPG D12999
'The accomodating spouse; Tyr-nn-es delight! - coming York over her; - or what you like'
by James Gillray, published by James Aitken
hand-coloured etching, published 15 May 1789
Archive Collection NPG D12999
NPG D13065
'The installation-supper, as given at the Pantheon, by the Knights of the Bath on the 26th of May, 1788
by James Gillray, published by Samuel William Fores
hand-coloured etching, published 4 June 1788
Archive Collection


http://www.seaham.i12.com/myers/m-bowes1.html
Augustus Hare (q.v.) later described Gibside as a beautiful place, with 'exquisite woods feathering down to the Derwent.' There were two ghosts, he says, one being Lady Tyrconnel of the spirited Delaval family, who lived with John Bowes, Mary's son, the tenth Earl of Strathmore, on rather too intimate terms. A lover of the theatre, John Bowes had become attached to her during amateur theatricals at Seaton Delaval Hall. Lady Tyrconnel's funeral in 1800 almost bankrupted the estate; he had her lie in state, with painted face and decked in jewels and Brussels lace from head to toe, in every town on the way to London, before final burial in Westminster Abbey.


Lord Fife and His Factor: Being the Correspondence of James Second ... - Google Books Result
by Alistair Tayler, Henrietta Tayler - 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 312 pages
Lord Tyrconnel married, secondly, in 1780, Sarah Hussey, then a minor, sixth and youngest daughter of John Hussey, Baron Delaval. ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=0898755719...


Equivocations of Gender and Rank: Eighteenth-Century Sporting Women
lived at Kew with Sir Francis Blake Delaval, was pronounced to have ..... instance (figure 21), who, at her divorce trial for adultery, defended her cor- ...
muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth-century_life/v026/26.1rizzo.pdf - Similar pages
by B Rizzo - 2002 - Cited by 1 - Related articles - All 5 versions

Eighteenth-Century Life
Volume 26, Number 1, Winter 2002
E-ISSN: 1086-3192 Print ISSN: 0098-2601
Rizzo, Betty.
Equivocations of Gender and Rank: Eighteenth-Century Sporting Women
Eighteenth-Century Life - Volume 26, Number 1, Winter 2002, pp. 70-93

More About Sarah Hussey Delaval:
Name 2: Delaval

More About John Strathmore and Sarah Delaval:
Single: Bef. 1800

Notes for Mary Milner:
http://www.thepeerage.com/p229.htm#i2284
Mary Milner
F, #2284, d. 5 May 1860

Last Edited=17 Jan 2003
Mary Milner married, firstly, John Lyon-Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore, son of John Bowes, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Mary Eleanor Bowes, on 2 July 1820. She married, secondly, Rt. Hon. Sir William Hutt on 16 March 1831. She died on 5 May 1860.
Her married name became Lyon-Bowes. Her married name became Hutt.
Child of Mary Milner and John Lyon-Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore

* John Lyon-Bowes



More About Mary Milner:
Died 2: 1844

More About John Strathmore and Mary Milner:
Marriage: 02 Jul 1820

Child of John Strathmore and Mary Milner is:
+ 2 i. John Milner2 Bowes, born 19 Jun 1811 in London, England; died 09 Oct 1885 in Streatham, County Durham, England.


Generation No. 2

2. John Milner2 Bowes (John Lyon-Bowes 10th earl of1 Strathmore, John Bowes 9th earl ofA, Thomas Lyon 8th earl ofB, John Lyon 4th earl ofC) was born 19 Jun 1811 in London, England, and died 09 Oct 1885 in Streatham, County Durham, England. He married (1) Joséphine Benoîte Coffin-Chevalier 1852. She was born 1825, and died 1874. He married (2) Alphonsine Alphonsine Maria St. Amand 1877.

Notes for John Milner Bowes:
http://homepages.tesco.net/~john.bowes/Maryeleanor.html
John Strathmore, the 10th Earl married Mary Milner on July 2nd 1820, but after the birth of their son John in 1811. Their son therefore was illegitimate. The 10th Earl died 3rd July 1820.

His brother Thomas claimed to be the 11th Earl as opposed to John Bowes, the son of the 10th Earl on the grounds of John's illegitimacy.

At the subsequent law case it was decided that John's claim to the title was invalid and the line of the Strathmores and the Scottish Peerage descended through Thomas.

John Bowes subsequently became an MP, resided at Streatlam Castle, carried out an extensive coal mining business, developed horse racing, and art. He won four Derbys. In 1852 he married a French girl, Josephine Benoite. They built the Bowes Museum to house their vast collection of pictures. John Bowes died childless 1885, his wife in 1874.



http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F07E6DF123FE533A25756C2A9669D94649FD7CF
NEW YORK TIMES
BOWES, THE TURFMAN.
October 25, 1885, Wednesday
Page 3, 260 words
Mr. Bowes was the natural son of the tenth Earl of Strathmore, and his parents were married after his birth. He inherited his immense property under the will of his father, who died when he was 9 years old. [ END OF FIRST PARAGRAPH ]


The Jurist - Google Books Result
by Great Britain Courts, Great Britain - 1849 - Law
7 Divorce. The second part, Mr. Hosack informs us, in his Preface, ... Patrick and Strathmore v. Bowes fall under the general rule ; and the case of Doe d. ...
books.google.com/books?id=SkowAAAAIAAJ...
Subject of a lawsuit over the issue of whether a marriage in England, subsequent to the birth of a child, would legitimate that child in Scotland; the issue was found in the negative. The title devolved upon his father's brother. However, his father's estates were not entailed and he received a fortune under his father's will.


http://books.google.com/books?id=azEQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA178&lpg=PA178&dq=strathmore+bowes+divorce&source=web&ots=H49sz3jfIR&sig=spoAWnF9anfcSoBBnyRu2VTSWz4&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=6&ct=result#PPA177,M1
An Historical, Topographical, and Descriptive View of the County Palatine of ...
By Eneas Mackenzie, Marvin Ross
pp.176-179


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bowes
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

John Bowes (19 June 1811 London - 9 October 1885 Streatlam, co. Durham)[1] was an English art collector and thoroughbred racehorse owner who founded the Bowes Museum in Barnard Castle, Teesdale. Born at Streatlam Castle into the wealthy coal mining descendants of George Bowes, he was the child of John Lyon-Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (1769-1820) and his mistress or common-law wife Mary Milner, later wife of Sir William Hutt.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Illegitimate birth
* 2 1820 legitimacy case
* 3 Subsequent career
* 4 Marriage
* 5 Foundation of the Bowes Museum
* 6 Second marriage and death
* 7 Will and bequests
* 8 Notes
* 9 References

[edit] Illegitimate birth

Because his parents were unmarried at the time of his birth,[2] he did not inherit the Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne title. All sources describe Bowes as the fully and openly acknowledged son of the 10th Earl.

[edit] 1820 legitimacy case

His father married his mother openly 16 hours before his death, with Lord Barnard, heir to the Earl of Darlington, as their witness. The marriage was incontrovertible, but Bowes's legitimacy was questionable. The 10th Earl's next surviving brother Hon. Thomas Bowes claimed the earldom and estates on the grounds of young John's illegitimacy. The Scottish courts agreed that the 1820 marriage had taken place, and that it had been between two unmarried persons. However, since his parents were not domiciled in Scotland (the crucial point of the uncle's challenge), he was not legitimated in Scotland.[3] The result was to make John Bowes officially illegitimate under English and Scottish law, which status came to matter more and more in the Victorian mores already coming into effect. A five year battle ensued over the estates, with the English estates going to John and the Scottish estates going to his uncle, the 11th Earl.

Bowes was raised at Gibside by his mother, now Dowager Countess of Strathmore. In 1831, she married his tutor William Hutt(1791-1882) as his first wife.

[edit] Subsequent career

Educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge,[4] John Bowes pursued an interest in theatre, art, and horse racing. A member of the Jockey Club, he owned Streatlam Stud that bred and raised racehorses at Streatlam and Gibside. His stable won the 2,000 Guineas three times, the Epsom Derby four times, and, in capturing the English Triple Crown with West Australian, won the 1853 St. Leger Stakes.

Bowes was a reformer in politics, in favour of triennial Parliaments and the removal of Bishops from the House of Lords. He was a Liberal Member of Parliament, for the South Durham constituency, between 1832 and 1847. He also served as Sheriff of County Durham in 1854.

[edit] Marriage

Bowes left England for France, allegedly because he was not fully welcome in Victorian society as a person of illegitimate birth. While in Paris, France, John Bowes met the actress Joséphine Benoîte Coffin-Chevalier (1825-1874),[5], daughter of a clockmaker, a woman passionate about painting and collecting.[6] She apparently became his mistress, but they married in 1852. For a time, the couple made their home at the Château du Barry in Louveciennes near Paris. They shared a passion for art and acquired a large collection that would ultimately be housed in the Bowes Museum. In 1868, she was made Countess of Montalbo.[7] Unfortunately both died before their museum project was completed. Josephine died in 1874 having had no issue.

[edit] Foundation of the Bowes Museum

The foundation stone was laid on the 27th of November, 1869, by Josephine Benoite, Countess of Montalbo, but she was apparently too ill to actually lay the foundation stone but merely touched it with a trowel.

[edit] Second marriage and death

In 1877 (marriage settlement 24 July 1877), Bowes remarried one Alphonsine Alphonsine Maria St. Amand, divorced wife of Comte de Courten [8] The second marriage did not turn out well, and it appears that John Bowes was attempting to obtain a divorce from his wife from March to May 1884. Alphonsine may have been mother of the Italian artist Angelo comte de Courten (1848-1925)[9] Bowes died childless in 1885.

[edit] Will and bequests

Durham County records: Bowes's will (dated 1 June 1878) left his wife Alphonsine an annuity of £3000 for life, as well as £20,000 to wife. Substantial sums were left to his curator Amelie Basset,[10] to his three named godchildren. The remainder of his estate, not entailed, was largely devised to the trustees of his first wife's will (registered 1875) for the purposes of setting up the Museum.

By the terms of his father's entailment, his English properties reverted to his legitimate cousins upon his death. Streatlam Castle was eventually sold by the family in 1922 on the eve of the wedding of Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon to HRH The Duke of York, allegedly to pay for the costs of the wedding. The derelict castle passed through many hands, and was demolished by its new owner Philip Ivan Pease in 1959, but the Pease family retains the lands till date. Gibside is now owned by the National Trust.

John Bowes is best remembered today as the founder of the Bowes Museum, which has been described as the Wallace Collection of the North.[11]

[edit] Notes

1. ^ Full dates and places are from Bowes, John: The Oxford Dictionary of Art.
2. ^ According to Augustus Hare, Strathmore went through a secret and false ceremony of marriage with Mary Milner to persuade her to live with him, and only revealed on his deathbed (in 1820) that he had never actually married her. Lord Hardwicke's Marriage Act (1753) made common-law marriages legally invalid for the first time in British history; thus by English law, Strathmore and Milner were never married. If the pair had been domiciled in Scotland, the fact that Strathmore and Milner had lived together as man and wife would have been sufficient to establish a marriage. Hare claims that young John Bowes was enrolled at Eton as Lord Glamis.
3. ^ Scottish private law on legitimation by subsequent marriage, which was based on Roman law, required that the parties have been free to marry at the time of their child's birth (which condition was fulfilled), and that the parties be domiciled in Scotland (which condition was not fulfilled). Since then, Scottish law on legitimation has been changed by the Legitimation (Scotland) Act 1968. This law would now permit even children born to adulterous parents who subsequently marry to be legitimated; see the case of Drumlanrig in 1973.
4. ^ Bowes, John Bowes in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922-1958.
5. ^ http://www.seaham.i12.com/myers/bowes1.htm John Bowes 1811-1885]
6. ^ Bowes Museum: Joséphine Bowes
7. ^ John Bowes 1811-1885, Op.cit. Unfortunately, the source of this title, which appears to be the Principality of San Marino, is unclear.
8. ^ Durham County records: Ref No. D/HH 5/1/105.
9. ^ Durham County Records: Strathmore Estate letters from Alphonsine Bowes to the Earl of Strathmore. She was preparing to leave Biarritz for London, presumably to answer charges brought against her.
10. ^ Some websites give her name as Amelie Basset, the daughter of his old dealer friend who had died the same year as Josephine. He had known her since she was twelve years old. The Bowes Museum says that she inherited her father's business and

in 1875 (one year after the death of Joséphine) John Bowes asked her to look after the Collection that was to be housed at the Bowes Museum in England. Amélie was responsible for the cleaning and repair of all the paintings in store, and supervising everything in the Temporary Gallery in France before organising the shipment of cases to Barnard Castle. Her important role was reflected in John’s will when he died: he left her £9000 [sic]!

. Amelie was therefore Bowes's Curator and one of the beneficiaries of his will, but not his second wife (as stated by some online sources). This is confirmed by the Durham County records which summarize the will dated 1878, where Amelie Basset, picture dealer, of 7 Rue Mansart, Paris, is left £5,000 (contradicting the Bowes Museum statement of £9000.
11. ^ See for example Bowes, John: The Oxford Dictionary of Art. The comparison might be deliberate; both men were the acknowledged sons of their fathers, wealthy peers; both lived in France for a considerable period; both married French wives, who had been previously their mistress.

[edit] References

* Charles E. Hardy - John Bowes and the Bowes Museum (1970, reprinted 1982) ISBN 0-9508165-0-7
* Sarah Kane. "Turning Bibelots into Museum Pieces: Josephine Coffin-Chevallier and the Creation of the Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle" Journal of Design History 1996 9(1):1-21; doi:10.1093/jdh/9.1.1 (unavailable without subscription online; citation provided)
* Durham County records: Hanby Holmes on the legal affairs of the Bowes of Streatlam.
* Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Volume I 1832-1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976)
* "A French Château in North East England, with Howard Coutts".
* Bowes Museum collections


Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
new constituency Member for South Durham
with Joseph Pease 1832-41
Lord Harry George Vane 1841-47
1832–1847 Succeeded by
James Farrer
Lord Harry George Vane

More About John Bowes and Joséphine Coffin-Chevalier:
Marriage: 1852

More About John Bowes and Alphonsine St. Amand:
Marriage: 1877


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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here we are, Francis Blake Delaval. Divorce, sodomy, abduction into forced prostitution, a mistress who fought a duel -- what could we be missing?

I've only included some documented amours of his -- there were unquestionably many more. Note, however, that he provided for his illegitimate children in his will. The son, at the time, was attending d'Angelo's Academy, which was fairly well known.

Some of the sites say that his wife, Isabella Tufton, Lady Nassau Paulett, daughter of the Earl of Thanet, was 60+ when they married circa 1750. She was probably about 48, but that still made her 25 years older than he was.


Francis Blake Delaval

Generation No. 1

1. Francis Blake1 Delaval (Francis BlakeA, EdwardB) was born 1727, and died 1771. He met (1) German singer 1749. He married (2) Isabella Tufton 1750 in Estimate, daughter of Thomas Thanet and Catherine Cavendish. She was born Aft. 1702, and died 10 Jan 1764. He met (3) Emily La Roche Abt. 1753 in (mock marriage). She was born Bef. 1738 in Estimate. He met (4) Ann Catley Abt. 1763.

Notes for Francis Blake Delaval:
An Historical, Topographical, and Descriptive View of the County ... - Google Books Result
by Eneas Mackenzie - 1825 - Northumberland (England)
books.google.com/books?id=-RtNAAAAMAAJ...
"The gayest and most accomplished Lothario of the age."


http://www.seatondelaval.org.uk/The-Delaval-Family.html
Francis Blake Delaval (1727 - 1771)

Eldest son of Captain Delaval inherited the estate on the death of his father in 1752. The most notorious of the family, a practical joker with a flair for theatrical entertainment, he was not really interested in running the estates, he left that to his brothers. His principle interest was the pursuit of pleasure but he was elected a Member of Parliament on three occasions, usually by dubious means. He also became a soldier for a while and was decorated for bravery in 1760. He spent his life in debt, and married an elderly widow simply to get her money. He had several mistresses and at least two illegitimate children. Francis Blake Delaval died alone in London in 1771, leaving large debts, which were never paid off. He was buried in the Chapel of Our Lady after an extravagant funeral.


http://74.125.113.132/search?q=cache:s8Ddd3PXcs8J:www.squillo.co.uk/westover/secure/documents/essays/Mews%2520and%2520the%2520St.%2520Johns,%2520Paulets%2520and%2520Hoopers.rtf+nassau+paulet+thanet&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=14&gl=us
Lord Nassau Paulet, married in 1731 Isabella d. of the late Earl of Thanet: she later cradle-snatched (in 1750) the notorious 23-year-old Francis Blake Delaval, bringing with her to the marriage a whopping £150,000 dowry which appears to have included the mortgage of the manor of Christchurch.

In 1749, Sir Francis Blake Delaval, on being told that his mistress was in bed with an Italian eunuch, seized a horsewhip and dashed off with one of his chair-men in order to suprise them. On his arrival, he instructed the chair-men to hold down his mistress while he flogged her, and then to hold down the eunuch while he sodomised him. [Julie Peakman in "Lascivious Bodies", quoting from Lawrence Stone "Road to Divorce" pp240-1].

Sir Francis Blake Delaval had the walls of the upper hall at Seaton Delaval Hall rigged with pulleys and ropes so he could pull them up and expose his guests in compromising positions.

He had his come-uppance at the Consistory Court of Doctors Commons in a trial instituted by his wife, for committing adultery with Miss Roach, alias Miss La Roche, alias Miss Le Roche. He was convicted of conspiring to abduct a female infant apprentice for the purpose of prostitution.

He died aged 44, alone and heavily in debt, in 1771.


Catalogue of Law Trials - Google Books Result
by Edmund B. Wynn - 2008 - History - 216 pages
Blake Delaval; Geo. Fitzgerald; Rev. J. Altham : Mrs. ... A General History of Modern Gallantry and Divorce: containing the most remarkable trials from 1780 ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=0554459426...


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dutillieul/ZOtherPapers/NewBWJ12Sep1771.html
Some Selected Reports from Berrow's Worcester Journal
Thursday, September 12th, 1771.
DURING the Life Time of his Father Francis Blake Delaval, Esq was much straitened in his Finances; and a Life of incessant Gaiety and Dissipation, at length brought him so embarrassed a Situation, that some Expedient was requisite to raise the necessary Supplies. At this Juncture old Lady N---- P----t signified that she had some Thoughts of Matrimony to Mr. F. a Friend of Frank's, who immediately hit on a Scheme whereby Mr. Delaval might make sure of her Ladyship and her Fortune, above £90,000. The Prospect was thus concerted, Mr.F. informed her Ladyship that there was a very extraordinary Man, a Conjuror, in the Old Bailey, who fortold such Events as were almost incredible, and could only be believe by their taking Place, and that if it was agreeable he would wait upon her to him; for though he had no great Faith in Fortune-Tellers, he had heard from several of his Friends such very extraordinary Occurrences predicted, and, which had happened precisely as mentioned by the Conjuror, that his Incredulity was not a little staggered. Her Ladyship snapt at the Bait, and the late facetious Jemmy Worsdale was appointed to personate the Conjuror, in a Lodging within a few Doors of the real Magician. Jemmy being acquainted with her Ladyship's Affairs, told her the most remarkable Transactions, to her great Astonishment. He then acquainted her Ladyship, that there was an Occurrence upon the Point of taking Place, which would be the most important of her whole Life. Her Ladyship being very inquisitive to know the Particulars, he informed her, "that she was on the Point of being married." "Indeed !" said she, "Pray, Mr. Conjuror, to whom ?" "I am not, her replied, at Liberty to acquaint you at present who is the Person; but I can acquaint you when and where you will see him, and point out to you his Dress." "Bless me ! tell me I beg of you." "On Thursday next you will be walking in the Park, you will there observe a tall fair Gentleman, remarkably handsome, dressed in Blue and Silver; he will bow to a Person in your Company the first Time he meets you; upon his Return he will join your Party. It is irrevocably fixed by Fate, that Man is to be your Husband." Her Ladyship asked no more Questions, but resolved not to fail being in the Park the Day the Conjuror had mentioned. Delaval appeared dressed precisely as described, bowed, joined, and in three Days, married her Ladyship.
As this Marriage was entirely with a View of repairing his Fortune, it cannot be supposed he had any great Attachment to her Ladyship. Indeed the Disparity of their Years might have been a sufficient Plea for his Infidelity, if the Disproportion of 60 and 24 can be admitted as such. A Divorce in the Commons soon took Place, by mutual Consent, it being agreed that her Ladyship should be detected in Bed with Capt. S-----ns, in order to give it a Colour.


The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Jest Book, by Mark Lemon This ...
SIR FRANCIS BLAKE DELAVAL'S death had such an effect on Foote that he burst ...... to sue in the Ecclesiastical Courts for a divorce _a mensa atque thoro_. ...
www.gutenberg.org/files/20352/20352.txt - 711k - Cached - Similar pages


The Jest BookThe Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings by Lemon, Mark ...
Sir Francis Blake Delaval's death had such an effect on Foote that he burst ...... by counsel before the House of Lords for a divorce à vinculo matrimonii. ...
www.scribd.com/doc/2391180/The-Jest-BookThe-Choicest-Anecdotes-and-Sayings-by-Lemon-Mark-18091870 - 901k - Cached - Similar pages

More About Francis Blake Delaval:
Died 2: Aug 1771

More About Francis Delaval and German singer:
Single: 1749

Notes for Isabella Tufton:
An Historical, Topographical, and Descriptive View of the County ... - Google Books Result
by Eneas Mackenzie - 1825 - Northumberland (England)
books.google.com/books?id=-RtNAAAAMAAJ...
This book states that she was the widow [sic] of the earl of Thanet.
NOTE: She was actually a daughter of the earl of Thanet.


Baronia Anglica Concentrata, Or, A Concentrated Account of All the ... - Google Books Result
by Thomas Christopher Banks - 1844 - Nobility
In 1691, Thomas Tufton, earl of Thanet, son, and ultimately heir of John, ... first, lord Nassau Paulet, and secondly Sir Francis Delaval, KB But in 1734, ...
books.google.com/books?id=NvQ7AAAAMAAJ...


http://www.thepeerage.com/p2533.htm

Isabella Tufton is the daughter of Thomas Tufton, 6th Earl of Thanet and Lady Catherine Cavendish. She married, firstly, Lord Nassau Powlett, son of Sir Charles Powlett, 2nd Duke of Bolton and Henrietta Crofts.
Her married name became Paulett.
Child of Isabella Tufton and Lord Nassau Powlett

* Isabella Paulett+ d. 8 Sep 1821


Memorials of the Family of Tufton, Earls of Thanet, Deduced from ... - Google Books Result
by Robert Pocock - 1800 - 156 pages
Lady Isabella married in 1731, to Nassau lord Powlett, (uncle to the duke of Bolton She died January 10th, 1764. It may be proper to notice, that upon the ...
books.google.com/books?id=hIAOAAAAQAAJ...


Ancestry World Tree: THE ROYAL AND NOBLE FAMILIES OF BRITAIN
ID: I51636; Name: Isabella Tufton; Sex: F; Birth: AFT. 1702; Death: 1764; _FA1: Lady. ... Suggested Next Step: Search OneWorldTree for: Tufton, Isabella ...
awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=freer&id=I51636&ti=4317 - 9k - Cached - Similar pages


Conqueror 152
Isabella Tufton, Lady, + 1764, Md.1) 1731, Lord Nassau Powlett, K.B., + 1741, s. of Charles Powlett, 2nd Duke of Bolton, K.G., P.C. ...
www.william1.co.uk/w152.htm - 55k - Cached - Similar pages


http://www.christies.com/LotFinder/lot_details.aspx?intObjectID=1011757

Charles Phillips (1708-1747)

Ladies and Maids of Honour in Greenwich Park: A Group Portrait of Juliana, Duchess of Leeds, Lady Charlotte Hamilton, Lady Isabella Tufton, and Henrietta, Countess of Pomfret, all wearing riding habits, two seated in a chaise, and two standing, with a groom and horses, in front of the Observatory

inscribed and dated 'May 16 1730'
oil on canvas
36 x 45in. (91.4 x 114.3cm.)
Pre-Lot Text

FROM THE FERMOR-HESKETH COLLECTION
Provenance

Captain Bertram Currie, Dingley Hall, Market Harborough; Christie's, 27 March 1953, lot 62 (200 gns. to Cuthbert)
Lot Notes

Juliana, Duchess of Leeds, was the daughter and co-heir of Roger Hele of Holwell, Devonshire, and married Peregrine Hyde, 3rd Duke of Leeds, on 9 April 1725, as his third wife. After the Duke's death on 9 May 1731, she married the Earl of Portmore. She died on 20 November 1794.
Lady Charlotte Hamilton was the daughter of James, 1st Duke of Hamilton and Brandon, and his second wife Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Digby, 5th Lord Gerard. On 1 May 1736 she married Charles Edwin of Dunraven. She died on 5 February 1777.
Henrietta, Countess of Pomfret was the only surviving child of John, 2nd Baron Jeffreys of Wem, and his wife Lady Charlotte Herbert. On 14 July 1720 she married Thomas Fermor, 2nd Baron Lempster, later created Earl of Pomfret. In 1727 he was elected a K.B. and appointed Master of the Horse to Queen Caroline. After the death of the Queen, Henrietta and her husband retired from the Court and toured Europe for several years, and there are numerous accounts in contemporary letters of them in society on the Continent. Lady Pomfret, a great letter-writer, was often ridiculed for posing as an academic. Her letters, which came into the possession of Lady Bute, were initially thought not worth publishing, but they were eventually printed in three volumes in 1805. She died on 15 December 1761, and was buried at Easton Neston. The estate was inherited by the eldest son George, who, through his great extravagance, had to sell the furniture and some other parts of the collection at Easton Neston to pay his debts; the highly important collection of statues and sculpture, formed by his father, was bought by Lady Pomfret, after they had suffered much from neglect, and she gave them to Oxford University.
Lady Isabella Tufton was the fifth daughter of Thomas Tufton, Earl of Thanet, Lord Clifford. She married firstly Lord Nassau Paulett, and secondly Sir Francis Blake Delaval, K.B. She died on 10 January 1764.


http://www.archive.org/stream/lifeofmissanneca00londiala/lifeofmissanneca00londiala_djvu.txt
Full text of "The life of Miss Anne Catley, celebrated singing performer of the last century; including an account of her introduction to public life, her professional engagements in London and Dublin, and her various adventures and intrigues... Carefully comp. and ed. from the best and most authentic records extant"
Sir Francis Blake Delaval was a gentleman of high and
respectable family, being son to a baronet and related nearly
by blood and affinity to several of the nobility. His
person was elegant, his face handsome, his manners pol-
ished, his education liberal, his conversation sprightly and
pleasing. Few ever possessed so many of those qualities
which fascinate the ladies, and few ever succeeded better in
obtaining their favours by humbling their proud hearts.
When very young this gentleman dissipated his patrimony

Life of Miss Anne Catley. 23

on women and play, till at last his finances being reduced
to the lowest ebb, necessity forced him to relieve them by
fortune hunting, a resource truly despicable.

The object fixed upon as the means of repairing his
shattered fortune, was Lady Isabella Pawlet, daughter to
the Earl of Thanet. This lady possessed a very considerable
fortune, with a very plain person and face, and a character
somewhat questionable according to evidence said to be
given by Foote, though unstained by any actual charges.

The truth is, Lady Isabella Pawlet (or Paulet") had a
penchant for the humorist, and if he had not been restrained
from matrimony, by having previously entered into the
indissoluble noose of Hymen, there is scarcely a doubt that
he would have refused the acceptance of a considerable
fortune on any terms ; but this being impossible, he resolved
to come in for a share, and fixed upon Delaval, with whom
he had long lived on terms of intimacy, as a proper instru-
ment.

Lady Isabella was a dupe to superstition. The old gipsy
woman at Norwood, whom she frequently visited, stood
higher in her estimation than Boyle or Newton, and she
put more confidence in the presages of an astrologer who
resided up four pairs of stairs in the Old Bailey, than was
ever placed in Copernicus.

Foote having informed his friend Delaval of the lady's
foible, they came to an agreement, by which the former
was to have an annuity of five hundred pounds a year, and
the principal to enjoy the remainder of the lady's fortune.

A maid servant was bribed to betray her lady, and the
conspirators having received information from her of a
particular day when her ladyship was to consult a cele-
brated conjuror, to whom, at that time, several women of

24 Life of Miss Anne Catley.

the first fashion paid frequent visits, to this imposing
rascal, Delaval and his friend Foote immediately repaired,
and having secured his services by a few guineas, informed
him of several of the most remarkable incidents in Lady
Isabella's life, the conjuror at the same time taking an
exact survey of Delaval's face and figure for a purpose
which shall appear presently.

Lady Isabella soon after arrived, accompanied by her
treacherous attendant, who by a sign previously agreed
upon, informed the impostor who his visitor was.

The answers given to the interrogatories of her ladyship,
and to the prepared questions occasionally slipped in by
her cunning abigail, left no doubt on her mind of the
conjuror's extraordinary and supernatural powers, and of
course brought forward the material enquiry respecting
marriage, which is generally the great end of all such
applications.

The impostor now pretended to consult a planetary
system that lay before him on his table. Having delib-
erately taken off a pair of large spectacles and turned up
his eyes towards Heaven, he muttered over the names
given to the signs of the zodiac and fixed stars, he drew a
number of circles and lines with white lead upon black
paper, and at last with a grave face described the person
and features of Delaval.

Lady Isabella, delighted at the description of her
intended cara sposa, rewarded the conjuror liberally, and
would now have retired, but her well-instructed companion,
pretending a tender interest in the future fortune of her
mistress, urged for further information, particularly as to
the time when and the place where her lover was to be
seen. The wizard answered that he could certainly com-

Life of Miss Anne Catley. 25

municate such information, but must first consult his
familiar spirit in an adjacent room, and immediately retired
to Delaval and Foote, who sat in another room, where
having waited a few minutes in consultation, he returned
to the women, and found Lady Isabella almost maddened
with anxious expectation. He told her that the gentleman
to whom the fates had destined her hand would be walking
the next day at twelve o'clock by the side of the canal in
the Green Park, but cautioned her not to speak first, as
that would break the charm, and having received another
fee for his pleasing news, Lady Isabella returned home in
rapture.

The description of the charming man described by the
conjuror had taken possession of this unfortunate lady's
brain ; she could not eat during the day, nor sleep during
the night. The morning sun, on rising, found her at her
toilette, culling ornaments, painting, washing, and per-
fuming ; and she involuntarily rambled to the place of
appointment an hour before the time. During this hour
this infatuated dupe to imposition kept her eyes rivetted
(9a the park gate, and every time it opened trembled from
head to foot with anxious expectation. Her repeater at
last struck twelve, and at that instant Delaval appeared,
dressed in every point exactly as the conjuror had described.

The sudden appearance of the gentleman extorted the
ejaculation of " heavens ! " from the lady, which was
followed with " Lord preserve us ! " from the maid ; but
Delaval continued to pass and repass them several times
without turning his eyes towards the seat, which was
indeed a necessary precaution, as he was ready to burst
into loud laughter every instant. At last, looking full at
Lady Isabella, he bowed respectfully, and, she returning

26 Life of Miss Anne Catley.

the salute, he walked towards her, and commenced a
conversation.

The surprise of the lady having by degrees subsided, she
discovered on recovering her senses that the stranger held
her hand; she reluctantly drew it from him, at the same time
heaving a deep sigh, which he returned with all the softness
of sympathetic tenderness. Before they parted an assigna-
tion was made for a future meeting at the same place, and
the swain took leave with an affected warmth of passion
and respect that totally threw the lady off her guard, and
expelled from her mind all considerations but those of
romantic love.

Delaval, on separating, flew to inform Foote of his success,
and then retired to indulge in tender conversation with
a favourite in King's Place. Lady Isabella locked herself
within her chamber, there to contemplate with rapture the
conquest she had made, or rather, indeed, on the lover,
who, in her opinion, Heaven in its bounty had created for
her specially. The more she thought the more she became
enamoured, and the second meeting totally overturned
every idea that prudence suggested. Delaval

" Could impart

The loosest wishes to the chastest heart."

And Lady Isabella was now at an age when the heart is
tender, though not over young. She was approaching
towards that grand climacteric which brings despair to
maidens, and having long regretted her situation she was
resolved not to lose the present opportunity of doing all
within her power for the good of her generation, and to
remove from herself that most horrid of all horrid epithets
to a woman's ear an old maid.

Life of Miss Anne Catley. 2T

The marriage, therefore, was soon celebrated, much to
the satisfaction of the bride ; but Sir Francis felt himself
rather uneasy on the occasion, which, however, he attempted
to put off with a laugh, and having been asked how he
could think of marrying so ordinary a woman, answered
"I married her for weight and paid nothing for fashion."

Had Lady Isabella been a Venus in beauty, and endowed
with the wisdom of Pallas, she would have found her
charms of body and mind unequal to fix the heart of
Delaval, ever on search for variety, and never satisfied
with any single object. But in truth her ladyship was
destitute not only of personal charms but of mental allure-
ments her conversation was as plain as her face.

A young lady named Roche lived at this time under the
protection of a near female relative to Delaval, and was
supposed by many to be a natural daughter to one of the
family. In the leading astray of this girl he soon suc-
ceeded. Her mind was weak, her constitution meretricious,
and instead of retreating from him, and repelling his
overtures, she met his affections with ardour, and lived
with him as his mistress for a considerable time indeed it
was a doubtful point which of the two was most in the
wrong.

This inconstancy on the part of Delaval naturally excited
resentment in the lady. Female pride could not patiently
submit to so gross an insult. She saw her fortune bestowed
upon a courtesan ; she felt that the husband to whom she
had administered the means of indulging his pleasures
affronted her by publicly appearing and living with his
mistress, and privately treating her, his wife, with neglect,
and even contempt that evinced disgust. This roused her
to revenge. She upbraided her husband with bitterness,

28 Life of Miss Anne Catley.

he answered with cutting coolness, and in the height of one
of their disputes discovered the secret of the conjuror.

Lady Isabella consulted her friends on this occasion and
they brought in the aid of the law. A case was drawn
and a suit of divorce was determined on, upon the grounds
that Delaval had committed adultery with Miss Roche.
Of the truth of this charge there could not be a doubt, but
Lady Isabella failed in the proof. The witnesses gave
evidence of the parties having rode out together, having
dined together, having lodged in the same house together,
but they failed in legally proving the offence on the
ground of which she sought relief and release from her
marriage contract.

Delaval thinking he had no offence to make, resolved
upon obviating the effect of his wife's complaint, which if
established would have materially injured his fortune, and
therefore he set up a charge of recrimination.

This charge states that a person named Craig took a
woman with him to Haddock's, at Charing Cross, on the
evening of a day when Delaval had invited some company
to meet him at the Cardigan's Head Tavern, Charing Cross,
among whom was the late Mr. Robert Quaime. To this
company he communicated that he had long believed his
wife to be inconstant, and had received information that
she was to be that night at Haddock's with a man who
went by the name of Brown, that he intended to be
convinced of the truth, and requested that the company
would go to the house with him in order to see if they
could detect her in the act. One Dupree was then des-
patched to Haddock's, and soon sent back a messenger to
inform Delaval that his wife was arrived. The company
then went to the place, when Dupree opened the door of a

Life of Miss Anne Catley. 29

room where Lady Isabella was said to be, and where they
saw a man and woman, the latter of whom one of the
witnesses swore was Lady Isabella, but in this he was not
corroborated by any of the other witnesses.

It was also deposed that her ladyship passed by the
name of Brown and met Craig, who also assumed that
name, at a lodging in Beaufort Buildings, where they
passed for man and wife ; but the general opinion was,
that the whole of the evidence against Lady Isabella was
fabricated and false and that her witnesses had been
tampered with and suborned. This suit in the commons
of course terminated all connubial connection between
Delaval and his wife, nor did his intimacy with Miss Roche
continue much longer.

Marriage Notes for Francis Delaval and Isabella Tufton:
Dictionary of Real People and Places in Fiction - Google Books Result
by M. C. Rintoul - 1993 - Reference - 1184 pages
... MP for Hindon in 1751 and for Andover in 1754, in 1761 he married Isabella, the widow of Lord Nassau Paulet and daughter of the Earl of Thanet. ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=0415059992...

More About Francis Delaval and Isabella Tufton:
Divorce: Bef. 1764
Marriage 1: 1750, Estimate
Marriage 2: 1761

Notes for Emily La Roche:
http://nq.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/issue_pdf/frontmatter_pdf/s10-XI/287.pdf
pp. 501-502.


Full text of "Notes and queries"
626, there is a storv of a duel between Miss Roach or Le Roche afterwards Lady Echlin (see 10 ...... MISS LA ROCHE, LADY ECHLIN : SIR FRANCIS BLAKE DELAVAL. ...
www.archive.org/stream/s10notesqueries12londuoft/s10notesqueries12londuoft_djvu.txt - 977k - Cached - Similar pages
MISS LA ROCHE, LADY ECHLIN : SIR
FRANCIS BLAKE DELAVAL.
(10 S. xi. 501 ; xii. 38.)
THE following extracts from Samuel
Foote's letters in the " Delaval Papers"
will supplement MR. HORACE BLEACKLEY'S
interesting note. Unfortunately, in the
majority of the private letters of the Delaval
family of the period under notice, the year
in which they were written is not given ;
and as they were all "franked" letters^
there is no official date-stamp. From
collateral evidence, however, Samuel Foote's
letters would be written about 1753 ; for
Sir Francis Blake Delaval, writing to his
brother, informs him, under date 24 March
1753 :

" I have just come from Mr. Foote's Farce, which
went off with applause. Miss Macklin danced a
minuet, played on a Sandola, and accompanied it
with an Italian song, all of which she performed
with much elegance."

Foote's letters in which he mentions Miss
Roach would be written in the same year
as Sir F. B. Delaval's letter. While Foote
was the intimate friend of Sir F. B. Delaval
he was also the companion of John, after-
wards Lord Delaval, and the letters pre-
served in the " Delaval Papers " in which
reference is made to Miss Roach were
addressed to John Delaval.

Under date of 5 April he writes :
"I have to thank Dear Mr. Delaval for his last
favour, which I own a little disappointed me
having flattered myself with the hopes of seeing
you in Town with your brother. ' The Englishman
at Paris has been better received than I expected.

Garrick and all the Deluise [?] of the Theatre say
kinder things of it than modesty will permit me to
repeat. Upon the whole it was damnably acted,
Macklyn miserably imperfect in the words and in
the character (oh, stain to comedy !). You might
have seen that 1 meant an English Buck by the
power of dulness instantaneously transformed into
an Irish Chairman.

"Miss Roach, accompanied by some frippery
French women, occupied, to the no small scandal
of the whole House, the Prince's Box ; whilst the
Duchess of Bedford, &c., &c., were obliged to take
up the Seats upon the Stage. The piece will be
printed the 25th instant, which I will enclose to
you."

On 17 January he writes from " Pal Mai "
" To John Delaval, Esq., at Seaton Delaval,

near Newcastle, Northumberland.
" I am sorry Dear Mr. Delaval should suppose he
wants a subject to interest arid entertain me, whilst
he has it in his power to communicate his own
happiness and that of his family. To the latter
you have this morning a collateral addition by the
birth of a Son to Miss Roach."

In a memoir of Sir Francis in ' The
Literary Register 'of 1771 (the year of his
death) the writer, after describing the
marriage and divorce of Sir Francis and
Lady Paulet, states that

" in the mean while Miss R h shone in all the
splendor of a duchess ; Frank presented her with a
new set of magnificent jewels, which she afterwards
lost, and was the subject of an inquiry before Sir
John Fielding. Like Ninon cle 1'Enclos, she made
no secret of her amour, but appeared at Ranelagh,
and other public places, with her son and daughter,
the pledges of their mutual affection."

Notwithstanding this evidence of the
weak side of Sir Francis Blake Delaval, it is
only just to add that the grief of his con-
temporaries at his death strongly marks his
character. With many foibles, caprices,
and even vices, Sir Francis was a valuable
member of society : he was generous,
sincere, affable, and polite ; his social
virtues and convivial humour rendered
him the soul of all merry meetings and
select parties, and he was universally known
and beloved. Horace Walpole, writing
about Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick,
asks : " Don't you know that next to Mr.
Pitt and Mr. Delaval he is the most iashion-
aole man in England ? "

JOHN ROBINSON.

Delaval House, Sunderland.


Politesse and the Woman at Risk: The Social Comedies of Marie ...
When Henry, disguised as La Roche, arrives, he tells Julia that Lord Henry .... Lady Emily's poor opinion of Delaval is confirmed by the housekeeper Mrs. ...
www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&se=gglsc&d=5009817599 - Similar pages
by A Scullion - 2004


More About Emily La Roche:
Name 2: Roach

More About Francis Delaval and Emily La Roche:
Single: Abt. 1753, (mock marriage)

Notes for Ann Catley:
http://www.archive.org/stream/lifeofmissanneca00londiala/lifeofmissanneca00londiala_djvu.txt
"The life of Miss Anne Catley, celebrated singing performer of the last century; including an account of her introduction to public life, her professional engagements in London and Dublin, and her various adventures and intrigues... Carefully comp. and ed. from the best and most authentic records extant"
The succeeding year she became an object of public
attention from a very remarkable circumstance. Sir
Francis Blake Delaval, one of the most notorious and
abandoned characters of the times, being charmed with her
beauty, and understanding that the master and his fair
apprentice could not agree, resolved on releasing her

Life of Miss Anne Catley. 7

entirely from the coercion of Bates, and making her his
mistress. Accordingly, it was agreed that Sir Francis
should pay Bates the penalty of the father's bond, and also
give him <2Q0 more in lieu of what she might earn for
him by the engagement that he had made for her with the
managers of Covent Garden Theatre and Marylebone
Gardens. In this purpose Mr. Fraine, an attorney, was
ordered to draw up a proper transfer of her indentures
from Bates to Sir Francis, and she and her mother were
removed into lodgings, where she lived publicly with Sir
Francis, was attended by his servants, and rode out with
him every day.


More About Francis Delaval and Ann Catley:
Single: Abt. 1763

Children of Francis Delaval and Emily La Roche are:
2 i. Francis2 Delaval, born Abt. 1754.
+ 3 ii. Charlotte Delaval, born Abt. 1756; died Aft. 1787.


Generation No. 2

3. Charlotte2 Delaval (Francis Blake1, Francis BlakeA, EdwardB) was born Abt. 1756, and died Aft. 1787. She married Robert Smith 1776.

Notes for Charlotte Delaval:
Lady Smith (Charlotte Delaval) and Her Children (George Henry ...
Charlotte, the daughter of Sir Francis Blake Delaval, married in 1776 Sir Robert Smith, Member of Parliament for Colchester. Their children are George Henry ...
www.metmuseum.org/works_of_art/collection_database/all/lady_smith...delaval_and.../objectview.aspx?... - 29k - Cached - Similar pages

More About Robert Smith and Charlotte Delaval:
Marriage: 1776

Children of Charlotte Delaval and Robert Smith are:
4 i. George Henry3 Smith, born Abt. 1777.
5 ii. Louisa Smith, born Abt. 1779.
6 iii. Charlotte Smith, born Abt. 1781.
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of all of the above, Ann Catley seems to have come closest to achieving a HEA:

http://www.rebus.demon.co.uk/biogs/a_catley.htm

if you count having ten more children as a happy life Rolling Eyes At least, she had a successful career and a stable relationship, though there's some dispute as to whether she and General Francis Lascelles ever actually got married.

Virginia
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Occasionally, reason did prevail. The protagonists here are George Augustus Chichester known as Lord Belfast before he became the 2nd marquess of Donegall and Anna, illegitimate daughter of Edward May, 2nd Bt.

Malcomson, The Pursuit of the Heiress
pp. 156-157
"The marriage fell within the provisions of Lord Hardwicke's act because it took place in England, Lord Belfast being incarcarated at the time in the Marshalsea debtors' prison in London, Although this did not come to light until twenty years later (1819), the marriage was invalid because Anna May was illegitimate as well as a minor. Under the terms of the act an illegitimate child could not legally marry under-age with the consent of only one parent, and Anna May's mother was long discarded or dead, and either way was not involved.

"The effects of the technical invalidity of the marriage were wide-ranging: the Donegalls' seven children were illegitimised, the settlement provision made for them was nullified, and the eldest son of Lord Donegall's younger brother became next-in-line for the marquessate and the Donegall estates. There had been a number of other instances of property being set adrift by the technicalities of Lord Hardwicke's act and public sympathy and even the sympathy of the majority of the members of the House of Lords, were on the side of the Donegalls. So, matters were retrospectively rectified by an act of parliament passed in 1822 -- an act which, along with a sequel measure passed in the following year, contained provisions which relaxed the rigours of Lord Hardwicke's act and presaged its suppression."
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's another case of marriage in mid-relationship, resulting in one of the couple's later-born sons inheriting the title. Anne King was a landscape painter. This example should be good for authors because it's right in the regency era rather than Georgian. Note that The Peerage has an incorrect date of death for the earl, 11 years after the publication of his obituary.


http://books.google.com/books?id=dR_AE9XH4SQC&pg=PA316&lpg=PA316&dq=waldegrave+anne+king&source=web&ots=T2XoZL7RDl&sig=viqv8IEMfc7g2hDVCrxS1Th2SFo&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result
The Gentleman's Magazine, 1835
p. 316
Obituary
Gives both birth and death dates as July 30.


http://www.thepeerage.com/p1085.htm#i10848

Lt.-Col. John James Waldegrave, 6th Earl of Waldegrave was born on 31 July 1785. He was the son of George Waldegrave, 4th Earl Waldegrave and Lady Elizabeth Laura Waldegrave. He married Anne King, daughter of John William King, on 30 October 1815 at Paris, France. He died on 28 September 1846 at age 61 at Strawberry Hill.
Lt.-Col. John James Waldegrave, 6th Earl of Waldegrave gained the title of 6th Earl Waldegrave.
Children of Lt.-Col. John James Waldegrave, 6th Earl of Waldegrave and Anne King

* Lady Annette Laura Maria Waldegrave+ d. 28 Feb 19561
* John James Henry Waldegrave b. c 1802, d. Apr 18402
* George Edward Waldegrave, 7th Earl of Waldegrave b. 8 Feb 1816, d. 28 Sep 1846
* Horatia Elizabeth Waldegrave b. c 1824, d. 24 Jun 1884

Citations

1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 901. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
2. [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 54. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Waldegrave,_6th_Earl_Waldegrave
Lieutenant-Colonel John James Waldegrave, 6th Earl Waldegrave (31 July 1785–31 July 1835) was a British peer and soldier.

Waldegrave was the second son of the 4th Earl Waldegrave and was educated at Eton. Upon his father's death in 1789, Waldegrave's elder brother George inherited the former's titles, but Waldegrave soon inherited them (aged eight), when his brother drowned in the Thames five years later.

On leaving Eton in 1801, Lord Waldegrave purchased a commission in the 55th Foot. He later transferred to the 3rd Foot Guards and in 1804 transferred to the 39th Foot as a Lieutenant without purchase. He later transferred to the 36th Foot and exchanged into the 7th Light Dragoons in 1805. He saw action during the Peninsular War. In 1808 he transferred to the 8th Garrison Battalion as a Major and a few months later exchanged into the 72nd Foot. He exchanged into the 15th Light Dragoons in 1809 and into the 12th Light Dragoons in 1812. Eight months later he purchased the Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the 54th Foot, which he commanded at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.

On his return home, he married his longtime lover, Anne King on 30 October 1815; they had had several children before their marriage and later had a further four. Lord Waldegrave was briefly a Tory Lord of the Bedchamber from 1830–31 and died in 1835. He was succeeded by his eldest legitimate son, Hon. George Edward, and his wife remarried in 1839, to Dr. Algernon Hicks.

Waldegrave later transferred to the 98th Foot.
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Waldegrave Earl Waldegrave
1794–1835 Succeeded by
George Waldegrave


A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of ... - Google Books Result
by John Burke - 1826 - Nobility - 400 pages
Miss Anne King, of Hastings, by whom he has issue Viscount Chewton. ... the vlscounty of Chewton and earldom of Waldegrave on the 13th of September, 1789. ...
books.google.com/books?id=qRUYAAAAYAAJ...
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 01, 2009 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the matter of care for illegitimate children, this man (who never married) is interesting:

Richard Hely-Hutchinson 1st earl of Donoughmore

The site on The Peerage is very discreet, but Malcomson is much more informative.

The Pursuit of the Heiress
By A. P. W. Malcomson, Ulster Historical Foundation
p.171-172

It covers his 1809 will which provided for sixteen of his bastards (very generously for a boy named John, who died in 1814, before his father). However, as time went on, his lifestyle continued to embarrass his younger brother and heir presumptive, who was quite irritated in 1821 that the earl had put two children by very "low women" out to nurse, but had neglected to pay their fees for the past two years.


http://www.thepeerage.com/p25008.htm
Lt.-Gen. Richard Hely Hely Hutchinson, 1st Earl of Donoughmore of Knocklofty was born on 29 January 1756.1 He was the son of Rt. Hon. John Hely Hutchinson and Christiana Nickson, Baroness of Donoughmore of Knocklofty.1 He died on 22 August 1825 at age 69, unmarried.1
Lt.-Gen. Richard Hely Hely Hutchinson, 1st Earl of Donoughmore of Knocklofty succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Donoughmore of Knocklofty, co. Tipperary [I., 1783] on 24 June 1788.1 He was created 1st Viscount Donoughmore of Knocklofty, co. Tipperary [Ireland] on 20 November 1797, with a special remainder to his mother's male descendants.1 He was created 1st Earl of Donoughmore of Knocklofty [Ireland] on 31 December 1800, with a special remainder to his mother's male descendants.1 He held the office of Governor of County Tipperary.1 He held the office of Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer Court of Exchequer [Ireland].1 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General.1 He was created 1st Viscount Hutchinson of Knocklofty, co. Tipperary [U.K.] on 14 July 1821, with a special remainder to his mother's male descendants.1
Citations

1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1162. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2009 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've come across a factual goldmine for regency-era writers:

http://www.napoleon-series.org/research/miscellaneous/Britishpeerage/c_britishpeerage.html

Just take a look at that menu on the bottom of this first page Idea
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2009 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you page down this for the careers of the 6th, 7th, and 8th earls of Coventry, there's enough stuff for a half dozen novels:

http://www.worcestershire.gov.uk/home/wcc-records-croome-coventryfamilyhistory

I thought the description of the 8th earl's 2nd wife was nicely understated:

http://www.worcestershire.gov.uk/home/wcc-records-croome-coventryfamilyhistory
George William, Viscount Deerhurst and 8th Earl of Coventry

Born 16th October 1784, the first son of George William (7th Earl) and his second wife, ‘Peggy’. He succeeded as Earl in 1831. He married his first wife Emma Susannah Lygon, 2nd daughter of Lord Beauchamp of Madresfield, Worcestershire, in 1808. Together they had one son, George William. Emma died only 2 years after their marriage and in 1811 the 8th Earl eloped to Scotland with Lady Mary Beauclerk (1791-1845), only daughter of Aubrey Beauclerk, 6th Duke of St Albans. They remarried on their return to England. George William and Mary together had a daughter, Mary Augusta, and a son, Henry Amelius Beauclerk. Not long after their marriage Mary had affairs with two of George William’s younger brothers, amongst others. Newspaper reports on the various affairs of the 8th Earl’s wife and the affairs he had in retaliation meant the reputation of the Coventry family had suffered greatly during this period. George William died 15th May 1843 at Coventry House, from an ‘unsound mind’.

In September 1834 the 8th Earl's eldest son and heir was blinded in a shooting accident at Donnington, just a few miles from Sir Charles Cockerell's new Indian Palace at Seizincote, Gloucestershire. He spent time in Seizincote recovering, where he met Sir Charles's eldest daughter, Harriet Anne Cockerell (1812-42). They became inseparable and decided to marry. Together they had a daughter, Maria Emma Catherine, and a son, George William (later 9th Earl). George William, Viscount Deerhurst, died from consumption, 5th November 1838. When the 8th Earl died in 1843, the title went to his grandson, George William, then aged only 5 years old.


Last edited by veasleyd1 on Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:00 am; edited 1 time in total
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This episode, which I have not fully verified, contains a couple of motifs that are very familiar from romance historicals:

Lady Constance Russell, Three Generations of Fascinating Women: And Other Sketches from Family History. London, New York, and Bombay, Longmans Green & Co., 1904.
p. 31
"William, first Earl of Cadogan, to cancel a gambling debt which he owed to Charles, first Duke of Richmond, engaged to give his daughter and co-heiress, Lady Sarah Cadogan, in marriage to Lord March, the Duke's eldest son. At the time of the wedding the bride was only thirteen years of age, and the bridegroom a few years older. She was amazed and silent; but the juvenile husband exclaimed, 'surely you are not going to marry me to that dowdy!' After the ceremony, his tutor took him off to the Continent, and Lady Sarah went back to her mother. Three years after, Lord March returned from his travels; but, having such a disagreeable recollection of his wife, was in no hurry to join her, and went to the theatre the first evening after his arrival in London. There he saw all eyes turned upon a lady in a box, whom he thought so beautiful that he asked who she was. 'The reigning toast--the Lady March,' was the answer he got. He hastened to claim her, and they remained throughout their lives the most devoted of lovers. Indeed, it was said she died of grief within a year of his death. they had a very large family of whom twelve survived; one of them was the celebrated Lady Sarah Bunbury, and one was the mother of Charles James Fox."
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JaneO



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

veasleyd1, I've heard that tale about the returning husband before, and I certainly hope it's true. If it isn't, it should be.
Didn't ELoisa James use it in one of her books?
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veasleyd1



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JaneO wrote:
veasleyd1, I've heard that tale about the returning husband before, and I certainly hope it's true. If it isn't, it should be.
Didn't ELoisa James use it in one of her books?


Yes, it's in one of the "Duchess" series, When the Duke Returns (with the serial numbers filed, off, of course, as Rosemary Edghill describes the process of fictionalizing history). I've seen it in a couple of others over the decades.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's another in the category of "no one would believe an author if she made him up." I've seen selected elements of his story in romances, though.


http://gamone.free.fr/skeffington/chapter4.pdf
Brain injured in a horse accident, about age 14.
After 1769 spent about 18 years in debtor's prison in France
Most of the long note copied at the end of this page appears to have been taken from this source.


http://www.thepeerage.com/p24851.htm#i248509

Clotworthy Skeffington, 2nd Earl of Massereene was born on 28 January 1742/43.1 He was the son of Clotworthy Skeffington, 1st Earl of Massereene. He married, secondly, Elizabeth Lane.1 He died on 28 February 1805 at age 62.1
Clotworthy Skeffington, 2nd Earl of Massereene gained the title of 2nd Earl of Massereene.
Citations

1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 2640. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.


His first wife, Marie Anne Barcier, was daughter of the governor of the Chatelet prison in France, where he was incarcarated for debts. Donaldson, Brewer's Rogues, pp. 442-443.


NOTE: The name of the second wife is also given as Elizabeth Blackburn.


The extraordinary career of the 2nd Earl of Massereene ...
Extraordinary Career of the 2nd Earl of Massereene, 1743-1805 (Ulster Characters ) ... be the first to write a review · learn more about the contest ...
https://www.alibris.com/search/books/isbn/0337022828 - 46k - Cached - Similar pages
NOTE: by A.P.W. Malcomson (author of The Pursuit of the Heiress), published 1972.


Brewer's Rogues, Villains, and Eccentrics: An A-Z of Roguish ... - Google Books Result
by William Donaldson - 2004 - Reference - 686 pages
... Britons Through the Ages Massereene, Clotworthy Skeffington, 2nd earl of caused ... of a developing relationship with Elizabeth Blackburn, a girl of 19, ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=0753817918...
Brewer's Rogues, Villains, and Eccentrics
By William Donaldson
pp. 442-443


http://www.leighrayment.com/peers/peersM2.htm
Clotworthy Skeffington, 2nd Earl of Massereene
Massereene's father died when he was a lad of 15. When he came of age, he inherited the family estates in county Antrim, but by then he had already settled in Paris, leaving the management of his Irish property in the hands of his mother.
His allowance of £200 per month could not, however, cover his tailor's bills, gambling losses and the demands of his many mistresses. Even so, he might have survived had he not become in a business speculation put to him by a crooked merchant named Vidari, who proposed to import salt to France from the Barbary Coast. Massereene signed a number of bills of exchange which he was called upon to honour when the business collapsed. While his mother, the dowager Countess, set about the task of raising the money required to pay his creditors, Massereene himself was thrown into prison. His creditors, aware of his extensive property in Ireland, assumed that he would become sick of imprisonment and pay the £30,000 he owed in order to obtain his liberty. However, Massereene insisted that the debts had been incurredby means of a fraud against himself, and he refused to acknowledge them. Rather than admit his guillt by paying the debts, he decided to stay in prison for 25 years, after which time, according to French law, the debts would be cancelled.
While imprisoned in the Chatelet prison, Massereene married Marie Anne Barcier, daughter of the prison governor. She made two unsuccessful attempts to help him to escape. Finally, in 1789, after 18 years in prison, he was released on the day before the storming of the Bastille by a mob which was partly inspired by bribes paid by Lady Massereene.
After his release, he returned to Antrim Castle, his seat in Ireland. He showed no interest in the way his estates were being run, leaving after a short period for London. Here, he was soon lured into another fraudulent business venture, again resulting in imprisonment for debt. Blaming his wife's extravagence for his problems, he deserted her at a time when her health had been ruined by her exertions on his behalf.
His total lack of feeling for his wife was the result of a new relationship with 19-year-old Elizabeth Blackburn, a servant in the house opposite his lodgings. Being a devotee of nude shadow-boxing, Massereene exposed himself at his window and caught her eye; soon she was living with him. Meanwhile, he had been swindled again to the extent of £9,000, which landed him in prison, where Miss Blackburn was allowed to join him. After a humiliating lawsuit in which he pleaded that he had acted with extreme foolishness, coupled with a loan from his brother-in- law, the Earl of Leitrim, he was eventually freed. In 1797 he returned to Ireland with Miss Blackburn. Although he owed his own liberty to the rebellious spirit of the French Revolution, he had a horror of Jacobinism and now took an active part in an anticipated uprising in Ireland. He formed a company of yeomen and trained it in his own peculiar fashion. The men were drilled without weapons; they simulated rifle shots by clapping their hands and presented arms in a complicated pantomime involving a series of hand signals. He also developed a number of new drills with names such as Serpentine and Eel-in-the-Mud. All this military activity convinced Massereene that he was a natural leader of men, an assessment not subscribed to the military establishment of the time.
When not drilling his troops, Massereene continued to indulge his personal whims. From time to time he ordered the dining table, completely set, all the chairs and an elaborate dinner, to be
hoisted onto the roof by means of a pulley. His guests climbed to the roof by means of a small ladder inside the house, but once they had assembled, Massereene usually declared himself dissatisfied with the arrangements and ordered everything to be taken down again. When one of his dogs died, all the local dogs were invited to its funeral at Antrim Castle. Some 50 of them, provided with white scarves, acted as a guard of honour.
When his loyal and unappreciated first wife died, Massereene married Miss Blackburn who, together with her family, had gained control of his fortune. On his death a few years later, his brothers contested the will and gained the verdict they sought.
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