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Comments on: The Lover Scorned http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975 Thu, 30 Jul 2015 19:45:27 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: beltone http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-59636 Thu, 22 Mar 2012 10:35:53 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-59636 This is the best site for anyone who desires to find out about this subject. You notice so much its nearly onerous to argue with you (not that I truly would want…HaHa). You undoubtedly put a brand new spin on a subject thats been written about for years. Nice stuff, simply nice!

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By: emergency lights http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-36477 Sat, 20 Aug 2011 11:18:04 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-36477 I enjoyed reading your informative article and considering the points you made. You make a lot of sense. This is an excellent piece of writing. Thanks for sharing this so we can all read it.

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By: Centerville Homes http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-35927 Mon, 08 Aug 2011 21:54:34 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-35927 I can tell the you went above and beyond in your research for this information. I’m really impressed with your writing ability and thought process.

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By: blackburn taxis http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-35642 Mon, 01 Aug 2011 17:30:33 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-35642 Your writing is impressive, informative and compelling. I was motivated to read your article twice due to the vast information and interesting content. Thank you.

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By: rod stewart 2010 tour http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-34364 Fri, 17 Jun 2011 14:44:24 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-34364 Your article is compelling, informative and very original. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading your views and agree with you on some. I am a thinking reader that appreciates intelligent, unique and thought-provoking content like yours.

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By: Susan/DC http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-6019 Mon, 02 Nov 2009 02:08:00 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-6019 Lynn Spencer said: “In some books it makes sense for the heroine to resist the obvious choice in favor of someone who just offers something no other person does. Still, I often end up feeling sad for the one rejected. When I read the Gardella Vampire books, I completely agreed that the heroine and the man she eventually wound up with belonged together, but the other possible hero was an interesting possibility, too. I hope we get more Gardella books someday!”

This series actually had 3 potential heroes, one of whom the heroine actually married in the first book. He was not, in the end, the hero of the series — he didn’t even make it to the second book. When I finished the first book I realized I should have been able to foretell his fate, because if he had continued, it would have been a much shorter series. However, I liked him a lot and hated what happened to him, so much that I couldn’t continue the series.

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By: Tracy Grant http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-6014 Sun, 01 Nov 2009 17:47:20 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-6014 Thanks so much, Rike! It’s lovely to find people who read the Anthea Malcolm books after all these years. Please thank your father too. When we wrote “”Philippa” we deliberately tried to create two guys who were more “typical” heroes and the have the heroine end up with the more atypical choice who was nevertheless her soulmate.

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By: Rike http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-6013 Sun, 01 Nov 2009 14:41:07 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-6013 Tracy,

I enjoyed The Courting of Philippa a lot! Goodness, it’s been ages since I read that! A big reason why I liked the Anthea Malcolm regencies so much is that there was often something so very unexpected about the plots. My father, who reads all my Regencies, thought so, too. This is a good occasion to let you know!

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By: Tracy Grant http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-6008 Sun, 01 Nov 2009 01:55:59 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-6008 This discussion is touching on so many fascinating points. Rike, I too find it more interesting and the happy ending more believable when both the hero and heroine have interests beyond each other, and I love characters with causes. (Perhaps because both my parents were very committed to their work and social justice, but were also very committed to each other and to me). But JMM, I totally agree, any sanctimonious character loses my sympathy, and a character so involved in his/her cause that he/she ignores the needs of beloved/children can be frustrating (I actually gave the hero in my book “Rightfully His” a father like that, a reformist clerbyman who was so busy saving the world his son was a bit neglected and also never felt he could live up to this father).

Going back to Rike’s original question, has anyone seen the movie/play “The Rainmaker”? (The movie has Burt Lancaster and Katherine Hepburn). In the end the heroine choses the more beta sheriff over the more charismatic “rainmaker” conman because she knows she and the sheriff have more in common.

One of my favorite movies, “The Philadelphia Story” has a triangle that involves two guys neither of whom are demonized. I’m sure where I’d put Mike and Dexter on the alpha/beta scale, but both are interesting, sympathetic guys.

Also, in my mom’s and my second Anthea Malcolm Regency, “The Courting of Philippa,” the heroine has to choose between a rakish aristocrat, a self-made barrister, and an acerbic, reform-minded writer. Both the aristocrat and the barrister are more obviously alpha than the writer (I don’t think I even knew the terms alpha and beta when we wrote this book), but she chooses the writer, because he’s the one she loves and the one with whom she has the most in common. Neither the aristocrat nor the barrister are bad guys-in fact, the barrister gets is HEA in the next book.

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By: JMM http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975&cpage=1#comment-6001 Sat, 31 Oct 2009 17:51:26 +0000 http://www.likesbooks.com/blog/?p=2975#comment-6001 Ok, I despise Rhett Butler. I don’t like Ashley, either; he was selfish to hold onto Scarlett instead of telling her, “Look. I’m not the man you think I am. Melanie loves me for who I am, not for who she thinks I am.”

But I loathe Rhett. He lies, he cheats on Scarlett, he’s never honest with her about his feelings until it’s too late. He’s constantly telling her he loves her, then pulling back – “Ha! You didn’t really think I meant it, did you?”

I wanted her to toss them both off a high cliff.

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