Eagerly Awaited Books – October 2014

It’s still pretty warm where I am in Virginia, so it’s hard to think October is just around the corner. This is especially true when I recall that the October list always seems to have that first wave of Christmas romances. I love me a romantic holiday tale, and I know I’ll be buying one or two to savor when the weather turns cold. What about you? What goodies does fall bring you?

Title and Author Reviewer
Darling Beast by Elizabeth Hoyt Darling Beast by Elizabeth Hoyt Haley, Lee, Caz, Cindy, Alex, Mary, Heather
In Your Dreams by Kristan Higgins in Your Dreams by Kristan Higgins Dabney, Mary, Heather, Jenna, Alex, Lee
Never Marry a Viscount by Anne Stuart Never Marry a Viscount by Anne Stuart Lynn, Caz, Cindy
Carolina Blues by Virginia Kantra Carolina Blues by Virginia Kantra Haley, Dabney
What a Lady Needs for Christmas by Grace Burrowes What a Lady Needs for Christmas by Grace Burrowes Caz, Mary
Indecent Proposal by Molly O'Keefe Indecent Proposal by Molly O’Keefe Dabney, Lynn
Rules for a Proper Governess by Jennifer Ashley Rules for a Proper Governess by Jennifer Ashley Mary, Lee
The Silent Sister by Diane Chamberlain The Silent Sister by Diane Chamberlain Shannon
The Counterfeit Heiress by Tasha Alexander The Counterfeit Heiress by Tasha Alexander Linnie
Season for Desire by Teresa Romain Season for Desire by Teresa Romain Caz
Too Friendly to Date by Nicole Helm Too Friendly to Date by Nicole Helm Dabney
Christmas Brides anthology Christmas Brides by Suzanne Enoch, Alexandra Hawkins, Elizabeth Essex, and Valerie Bowman (contains both new and previously published stories) Lynn
Hope Burns by Jaci Burton Hope Burns by Jaci Burton Haley
Truth Be Told by Hank Philippi Ryan Truth Be Told by Hank Phillippi Ryan Shannon
The Missing Place by Sophie Littlefield The Missing Place by Sophie Littlefield Dabney
Betrayed By His Kiss by Amanda McCabe Betrayed By His Kiss by Amanda McCabe Lynn
Chained by Night by Larissa Ione Chained by Night by Larissa Ione Shannon
Deceived by Irene Hannon Deceived by Irene Hannon Maggie

TBR Challenge 2014 – Pick a Book For Me

dukesholiday For my “Recommended Read” in this month’s TBR Challenge, I chose The Duke’s Holiday by Maggie Fenton, a book which a number of my friends on Goodreads enjoyed and which was recommended to me by one of them.

It’s a fairly simple story – a very proper, highly fastidious duke with what the synopsis indicates is Obsessive (or is it Obsessional?) Compulsive Disorder meets his match in the form of a feisty, flame-haired mess of a women who thrives on chaos. I normally like the “opposites attract” trope, I like comedic romances, and the person who recommended it and I normally have very similar tastes, so it seemed like a good bet for a fun read.

Unfortunately, however, I seem to be in the minority of people who aren’t wild about this book. It’s not terrible by any means, but there are a number of things in the execution that just don’t work for me and to be honest, I didn’t find it all that funny. Continue reading

You Never Forget Your First

Sweet-Savage-LoveHere at All About Romance, our team of reviewers is dedicated to the romance genre. We read, review, and keep up with the goings on of all things romance. We’ve even had quite a few people who turned to writing romance as well. I wouldn’t call us romance addicts, per say, but we definitely have a strong habit. Like any good addiction hobby, there had to be a first time that captured our attention and made us life-long romance lovers. Continue reading

A Formula for Romance… Novels

Math_FormulaCritics of romance novels often cite a long list of problems with the books and one of the most frequently used is that the books are formulaic. Some authors embrace that idea and give a guide to what they think of as “the formula” such as Paula Graves or Rita Clay Estrada and Rita Gallagher. Others like Anne Gracie heartily reject the idea. Harlequin calls it a format and insists that all genres use such a tool. Continue reading

Checking in with Sarah MacLean

imageI was lucky enough to get a chance to sit down and chat with Sarah MacLean while at RWA. (This was before she won the RITA for best historical romance!) I wanted to follow up with her. I’d talked to her in December of 2013 about her challenge to The New York Times and that paper’s dismissal of romance. Since then, Sarah has been writing a regular column for the NYT’s rival, The Washington Post, about–gasp–romance novels.  Continue reading

Is that a sword in your pocket?

Michael-Douglas-and-Kathleen-Turner-in-Romancing-the-Stone-1984-Movie-Image-200x277In the early days of romance adventure stories were a fairly standard part of the landscape. One need look no further than Dangerous Men and Adventurous Women edited by Jayne Ann Krentz to read all about the risk takers and adventurers who peopled the books of the late eighties and early nineties. Then the tide changed and books which had once been full of daring exploits in exotic locales began to revolve around balls, spies, and familiar locations like Western Europe or America. The disappearance of the swashbuckler occurred so long ago I had actually forgotten how much I loved those old tales. Continue reading

TBR Challenge – Heating Up the Summer

shiver As summer comes to an end, I’ve been challenged to read a book with luscious love scenes. I immediately thought of Harlequin’s Blaze line, and grabbed Shiver by Jo Leigh, a 2010 release that is still available digitally. Though the story wasn’t quite as steamy as I’d expected, I still ended up with a sexy, fun read, and I’d give it a B.

My first recommendation to readers? Don’t judge this one by its cover. It’s a lot more offbeat and fun than that somewhat generic picture would suggest. After all, the hero not only owns a supposedly haunted inn; he also makes independent documentary films. The semi-reclusive comic strip writer known for her snarky humor didn’t strike me as a run of the mill character either.

Both lead characters are city folk who have no intention of leaving their usual environment, but they’ve ended up at a quaint, haunted inn in Colorado for plausible enough reasons. Sam Crider has inherited the inn where he grew up, and he’s come home temporarily to run it while trying to sell. Carrie Sawyer, on the other hand, has only come to the Crider Inn as a somewhat reluctant guest. Continue reading

50 Shades of Readers

VanGogh woman reading“All sentences are not created equal,” Jenny Davidson tells us in Reading Style: A Life in Sentences. Her tale is not so much about “which books must be read than about how to read.” Her main conversational point is the “sentence, sometimes the paragraph, its structure and sensibility, its fugitive feel on the tongue.” In other words, Ms. Davidson is talking about the value of a book derived not from the book’s life lessons or even overall cohesive tale but its structure – the beauty and efficacy of its prose. Continue reading

TBR Challenge – It’s RITA Time!

prospero Note: This year’s RITA awards will be held next week at the RWA National Conference, so the July multi-blog challenge is focusing on reading RITA nominees and winners.

My choice for the multi-blog TBR challenge was Prospero’s Daughter by Nancy Butler, a RITA award winner in 2004. I loved it – it’s a beautifully written and tender romance in which an ex-soldier helps a badly injured young woman to recapture her spirit and zest for life in the face of the neglect of her seemingly perfect family. Morgan Pearce is inveigled by a friend into visiting the friend’s father to assist him in writing his memoirs. Not long after his arrival, Morgan literally stumbles across a lonely young woman sitting in a bath chair in the gardens, seemingly abandoned. She is Miranda Runyon, a relative who lost her parents in an accident three years previously, and who was left seriously injured. Her family has basically shut her away and now ignores her existence, and Miranda, once a vital, independent young woman, has more or less given up. Continue reading