What does Megan Frampton want? A smart man.

tDGtCBIf I have any type beyond the physical, it is that the guy be smart. As in smarter than me, smarter than everyone in the room, but not a jerk about it. I want someone who knows things, who craves knowledge, who is delighted to share his arcane bits of ephemera floating around in his brain with me.

Of course, since many of us are working out our issues through our writing, and I am no exception, I will say that my dad was one of those guys. But he needed to know, and have everyone else know, that he was the smartest guy in the room (he usually was, too, but he could also be the jerkiest about proving it). In my fictional scenario, the smart guy in question is so confident in his smarts that he just needs to show he’s worthy of me.

And that, in its essence, is what good romance does—proves that each of the two protagonists are worthy of one another, even if they are not necessarily worthy at large to the world. The romantic world is a microcosm between two people (I am excluding ménage et al, since I don’t write that, and I wouldn’t feel confident I could speak with authority on what it wants to do). Those two people, by the end of the book, believe that only through being with the other one that they are complete, or stronger, or whatever their ultimate life-goal is.

Now, this makes it sound as though I’m writing super-weighty stuff, and I will be the first to admit that I do not. I write mistoricals, books that are set in history but are not always true to the period. But my characters (at least according to me) are universal for any time period, so they can act and react and generally behave as people would now, because love is love and being anxious about another person might feel the same two hundred years ago as it does today. That’s what I responded to when I read my first historical romances, especially Anya Seton’s Katherine and, somewhat less proudly to admit, Kathleen Winsor’s Forever Amber. I got so much interesting history as I was inhaling the romantic elements of those books, and the Barbara Cartlands I glommed that it was a natural thing for me to write historicals when I decided to try my hand at writing.

And my characters—because I had to return to my original point sometime—are hopefully smart in some ways, even if they’re not smart in all the ways. For example, Marcus in The Duke’s Guide to Correct Behavior is very aware of his own limitations, and how he has been altered by his upbringing. I don’t think many characters, much less heroes, are as sensitive to what made them be the way they are as Marcus is. Lily is more traditionally book-smart (she’s a faux governess, after all, but pretty good being that she’s faux and all), but she is also savvy about the world, and is smart enough to take charge when the situation demands it.

And my point? Well, I don’t have much of a specific point, but that’s kind of like my books—they ramble around for awhile, and things happen, and you (hopefully) meet interesting people, and then you get that sigh of satisfaction at the end (again, hopefully).


Megan Frampton is the author of five historical romances. She is a member and President of the Beau Monde (2004-2005), the Regency chapter of the Romance Writers of America, and a member of the NYC chapter of the RWA as well.

Talking with Joanna Bourne

Dabney: Thank you so much for talking with me. I am an unabashed Joanna Bourne fan girl and have been ever since I first read The Spymaster’s Lady. AAR readers have loved your Spymasters series; I’m sure many of us are counting the days until the release of your newest, Rogue Spy. Continue reading

Happily Ever….

QRMOne of the most – cough – discussed posts we’ve had on Queer Romance Month recently has been about the happy ever after in queer romance. What the post, and the responses to the post, highlighted for me was just how complex and emotive this issue is. And while that would probably make any normal person STFU, I’d kind of like to talk about it. So the next two QRM-inspired posts for AAR are going to be about the HEA: in this one I’m going to ponder what HEA means in the context of queer romances, and in the companion post next week, KJ Charles is going to talk about why the HEA is valuable and necessary on its own terms. Continue reading

Interviewing Jaci Burton

JaciBurtonAuthor Jaci Burton has written over forty-five novels and is contracted to write ten more. She writes in multiple genres, from erotic romance to romantic suspense to contemporary romance. She has won the RT Book Reviews Reviewers Choice Award, and has been nominated for the award four times. She has been a finalist in the Bookseller’s Best and National Reader’s Choice Awards, and has won The Romance Studio’s CAPA Award four times. Her latest contemporary romance, Hope Burns, will be released on September 30th.  Jaci has very generously offered a copy of Hope Burns to three lucky AAR readers. To be entered in this giveaway, just enter your name in the comments. Continue reading

Molly O’Keefe talks about winning the RITA while not wearing shoes, the Boys of Bishop, her love for The West Wing, AND gives away three books.

Molly O’Keefe won the RITA this year for her contemporary novel Crazy Thing Called Love. Her latest romance, Indecent Proposal, comes out at the end of this month. I have had the great fortune to talk with Molly several times–she is one of the funniest women I’ve ever met–and I am pleased to be interviewing her today. Continue reading

Chatting with Virginia Kantra about her Dare Island series

CBCarolina Blues, the fourth book in Virginia Kantra’s appealing Dare Island series comes out next month. Today, Virginia talks with AAR about heroes, sex scenes, and happy endings. Virginia is offering the Dare Island novel of his or her choice to three lucky AAR readers. To enter this giveaway, please leave a comment.
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Checking in with Sarah MacLean

imageI was lucky enough to get a chance to sit down and chat with Sarah MacLean while at RWA. (This was before she won the RITA for best historical romance!) I wanted to follow up with her. I’d talked to her in December of 2013 about her challenge to The New York Times and that paper’s dismissal of romance. Since then, Sarah has been writing a regular column for the NYT’s rival, The Washington Post, about–gasp–romance novels.  Continue reading

It’s a Lucky Harbor Day: We’ve got Jill Shalvis and a Giveaway!

JillShalvisMany a romance reader knows Lucky Harbor, the fictional town where Jill Shalvis has set (thus far) nine novels. All good things must come to an end, however, and Ms. Shalivs has penned the last three love stories she plans to set there. The first of these, It’s In His Kiss, was released yesterday.

We are happy to have Jill here today. Not only is she answering questions, and sharing an excerpt, she’s giving away a Lucky Harbor novel of your choice to three AAR readers. To be entered in the drawing, just leave a comment below.

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