And 12 points go to … Germany!

On Saturday, the German contribution to the 2010 Eurovision Song Contest (also called the Grand Prix de la Chanson) won, the first time in 28 years. It’s a charming song and a charming performance, so here it is.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmOeISUYXuI&feature=related[/youtube]

I watch the Eurovision Song Contest every single year, even when on holiday (there’s ususally at least one channel showing it). Some songs are bad, many mediocre, but several times a performer has come to my attention that I liked, and even bought a CD from. The greatest fun lies in judging the costumes, make-up, dancing, singing and general stage effects, guessing on whom these performers model themselves on, and getting an insight on what is considered pop culture all across Europe.

Any song that wins, nowadays, must capture the hearts not only of Western Europeans, but also Eastern and Southern Europeans – not an easy feat! As a result, although many points are given due to old alliances and strong minority groups, the actual winners are mostly songs that have a certain something.

The songs’ styles vary wildly, to put it mildly. To give you a taste, here are this year’s runners-up. From Turkey:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8nmCUkNEYY[/youtube]

From Romania:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AYMXnfS_uc[/youtube]

And from Belgium:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofHe-rXn8es[/youtube]

Now that the Eurovision Song Contest is to take place in Germany next year, it will be even more exciting!

– Rike Horstmann

5 thoughts on “And 12 points go to … Germany!

  1. Marcella

    Congratulations, Rike!
    (and I’m sooo happy you didn’t put the Dutch entry here :-))

  2. Nathalie

    The ESC is a big deal in Sweden. his year I wasn’t that interested but I liked Germany, Moldova and Sweden of course =)

  3. Jean Wan

    Are they always in English? I understand the logistics, but what a same they don’t sing in their own language.

  4. Rike

    There was a rule for oh so many years that you had to sing in one of the official languages of your country (which gave Switzerland quite a choice). But because no-one could understand the lyrics in the other countries (who, after all, must vote for the song), this gave an unfair advantage to songs from England and Ireland, and to a lesser extent to all songs sung in French. And many artists were upset, because they felt they would be able to selll more records of the song in English.

    Now only a few artists do not sing in English. In some way it is a shame, but it does make the lyrics easier to understand!

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